Animal conversion to methanol

2127Gundy

New member
Would someone please clarify what needs to be done to a new Animal engine to convert it to methanol? I am looking to do as much as I can by myself. That's part of the fun in karting, I think. Thanks for any and all input, it's greatly appreciated.
 

Brettm57

Member
Simplest way is to buy the methanol jet kit from Briggs and install in your carb. Takes all the guesswork out of it.
 
Post this up in the animal section and you're likely to get more responses there.

First is the carb:
ream main nozzle to .106."
Main jet @ .049"
Pilot @ .022"
BGB Needle on middle slot.
Floats at .865" height, 1.050" drop.

Stock key, or 2* advance.

Real advantage with alky comes with extra compression - ie mill head and deck of block.
Match the pipe with a full window cam profile, and you've got a good start.

All fairly conservative settings, but it'll get you on the track, or to the dyno where the real testing begins.

-----
🏁Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
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www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
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32 years of service to the karting industry
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765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 
Simplest way is to buy the methanol jet kit from Briggs and install in your carb. Takes all the guesswork out of it.
You could do that too, but most of the parts in that kit aren't used, depending on your set-up.
The Briggs alky kit comes with a .110" main nozzle and you'll have to use the BHA needle to make that big of nozzle work.
Most builders doing stock class stuff are smaller at the nozzle and use the standard BGB needle.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Alki burns best at 6 – 1
gasoline burns best at 14 – 1
that would tell me that running alcohol requires jetting increases of 133%

Remember, that's the area of the jet, not the diameter.

So .038" is what you have now?
The math says, contrary to others advice, that you need a .058" jet on the high-speed. I don't know what the low-speed jet is at the card came with, but the math is the same.

Never having race that engine, take this advice with a grain of salt, but the math is the math.

The math says, contrary to others advice, that you need a .058" jet on the high-speed. I don't know what the low-speed jet is at the card came with, but the math is the same.

Never having race that engine, take this advice with a grain of salt, but the math is the math.

You've heard them talking about, during an IndyCar race, running full rich or running lean. Full rich gives you more power, but Elke will run lean if you wanted to.

You've heard them talking about, during an IndyCar race, running full rich or running lean. Full rich gives you more power, but Elke will run lean if you wanted to.
 
Al, your speech recognition software is on the fritz, or you're turning into a somewhat presidential speaker. :)


.058" is way rich for a stock animal.
It's only a 22 mm carb. and remember we're dealing with a slide carb with a tapered fuel needle.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Al, your speech recognition software is on the fritz, or you're turning into a somewhat presidential speaker. :)


.058" is way rich for a stock animal.
It's only a 22 mm carb. and remember we're dealing with a slide carb with a tapered fuel needle.
Yes, speech to text technology is still not there completely, plus my editing skills could use some improvement, getting old you know. Thanks for the heads up.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Small problem with my speech software, to continue.

You have practical experience, I have my spreadsheets. My spreadsheet estimate of the proper jetting differs from your suggestion by 40%.

Perhaps, as you pointed out, it's in the metering of the fuel flow. I have no way to tell, I have to leave that to you.

Still, something is going on, because it takes 133% more alcohol than gas for a proper mixture. According everything I've read!

In IndyCar racing, they speak of full rich and lean, could it have something to do with it, because the cars run, without detonation, at both settings. Wish I knew what those settings meant. What's the difference between "full rich" and lean?
 

Pete_Muller

Moderator
I'd say it's likely that full-rich on an IndyCar means tuned for absolute max power/speed, whereas "lean" likely means tuning for most efficient use of fuel (some tradeoff which tunes for best fuel mileage without sacrificing too much in speed).

I believe 133% more fuel for alky vs. gas is considerably too high, at least in my experience with 2-strokes. In road racing, a very fast "stock appearing" engine (fully modified, but with a relative small carb) would burn a bit over 3 gallons in an hour if running straight gasoline. An open engine with no limitations on carb size would typically use just under 6 gallons alky. That's at the same weight as well (stock appearing light vs. open light).

PM
 

flattop1

Dawg 89
You say new as in new out the box from briggs .
Cam choices ano1 and ano2 , if there any different then a briggs cam . Milling the head as brian ststed.
Plus full blueprint and degreeing the cam .
The carb work will get you on methanol .
The other stuff is cream on the cake . = More power .
 
Would someone please clarify what needs to be done to a new Animal engine to convert it to methanol? I am looking to do as much as I can by myself. That's part of the fun in karting, I think. Thanks for any and all input, it's greatly appreciated.
Read posts # 2 3 and 4 and you will find the correct answer. Especially what Brian Carlson said. If you just buy the kit it is close, good enough.
Brian's will get you better results.
 
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