Animal rebuild

dirtrookie38

New member
On the old forum there was a technical forum where someone had a step by step disassembly and rebuild for the animal. Did that make it back on here or can anyone tell me how to find out who it was.
 
I think Jamie Webb posted that. I don't think that made it to the new forums. Jamie may have that saved that he could have "stickied" to the top of this forum.

If you have specific questions - ask away. There's a good group of animal builders who frequent this section daily. Steve, Jimbo, myself, and others are very good about sharing information.


--
Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cuts
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
Celebrating 25 years of service to the karting industry
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 
If you want to build you're own motor I have a variety of kit motors for you.
Just go to my website and check them out.
 
After a quick read I have some revisions that you will probably agree with:

#1 Need to be specific to not mirror polish the crank pin when using the stock or WF rod. The rough surface is for oil retention.
#2 If you Loctite the flywheel side crank bearing you need to clearance the crank for a looser slip fit on the bearing, otherwise you will get zero crank end play. The Loctite is/was necessary only on older blocks that should probably be replaced anyway.
#3 If the motor is not already equipped, replace the rocker plate, arms, studs and balls with the metric (larger) parts.
#4 The carb section was omitted.

The Animal engine is by far the easiest motor to build for the non professional. Much easier then the flathead or clone. By following everything in Jamie's excellent article a careful and technically knowledgeable novice can build a competitive motor. In fact I have disassembled numerous motors built by well known builders that did not do everything listed here!
 
Sure, Jim. It's easy to appreciate the time & effort that went into Jamie's post above. Though I've never met or spoke to him, I respect the commitment he made to address the question (even if it was done at an earlier date) that started the thread. Because of that, I was surprised when another took the opportunity to promote their own stuff.
 
Dan
Since most people do not have the equipment to do their own machine work i provide an engine that comes in kit form if they choose to go that route.

"-Machine work-
Do your inspections and right your depth checks down so you know how much to take off. Now, here is the important part you have to pay CLOSE attention to. There are several WKA depth and thickness heads on the head. And once you start machining one surface on the head, you better be checking ALL your depth AND head thickness measurements. It is VERY possible to not even be close on the head shallow portion depth check but get very close or go below the minimum head thickness check. It is VERY important you measure these depths and thicknesses properly.... measure twice, cut once to ensure you stay legal when doing machine work. Your best bet is to let an experienced machine shop familiar with the rules do this work for you if you are not familiar with it yourself. Most shops will deck a head pretty cheap (a lot less than buying a new head)."
 
After a quick read I have some revisions that you will probably agree with:
#1 Need to be specific to not mirror polish the crank pin when using the stock or WF rod. The rough surface is for oil retention.
Agree. The noted crank polishing was ONLY for rods with babbit bearings. For stock or WF rods, I do not polish the crank at all.
#2 If you Loctite the flywheel side crank bearing you need to clearance the crank for a looser slip fit on the bearing, otherwise you will get zero crank end play. The Loctite is/was necessary only on older blocks that should probably be replaced anyway.
Agree. This was fixed with Animal 4 and up blocks. No need for this anymore.
#3 If the motor is not already equipped, replace the rocker plate, arms, studs and balls with the metric (larger) parts.
Agree, I really like the new parts.
#4 The carb section was omitted.
Not really sure how the carb section got deleted. I'll see what I can find. I also used to sell carb jet kits and I know I had all the info in there for setting up carbs so one way or the other I will find the info and get it up. Of course there is a WIDE range of what works for some people in the carbs so the setups I post will be a good starting point but in no way the only way that works.
The Animal engine is by far the easiest motor to build for the non professional. Much easier then the flathead or clone. By following everything in Jamie's excellent article a careful and technically knowledgeable novice can build a competitive motor. In fact I have disassembled numerous motors built by well known builders that did not do everything listed here!
Agreed and that is why I wrote the article above.
 
I just moved Jamie's posts to a new sticky thread at the top of this forum. The new thread is closed, but Jamie can edit it or add posts as he sees fit.
 
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