Best 206 chassis

gary10

Member
Just kidding. But I would like to hear opinions on what handling characteristics, adjustments, designs, or parts would make up the ideal 206 kart. This could even be a certain idea you just haven't seen on a kart yet. Please try to keep the post positive and focus on the things you like about certain karts instead of bashing any certain brand. Thanks for any contributions!

Examples: Heel rests, cool sticker kit design, axle size, front spindles size, adjustable ride height front/rear, high quality brakes, lightweight components, etc

Gary Lawson
 

Jimbo

A trial w/o witnesses is like racin w/o tech
Easy adjustable caster, camber and toe.
Front spindles with a more generous radius so they are less prone to breaking.
Or just plain stronger spindles.
No welded seat struts.
Easy adjustable spindle height.
Rear axle weight jack.
Front bumpers that allow you to use CIK or Gold Cup nose.
A chassis that is designed for the 206. Not a 2 cycle chassis that is being sold as a 4 stroke chassis.
 

Gab507

Member
I like karts with the "L" block and heim setup. It makes it very easy to adjust caster and camber independently. Coyote also has a great setup for this. I absolutely hate the pills. They seem like a compromise at best unless a sniper type system is used. I would like to see axles manufactured with the option to move wheels in without having to machine the axle yourself.
 

fatboy1dh

Member
What is your end goal, Gary?

For me, personally, I want the kart to be as free as possible with a big guy like me in it. There seems to be a market for that type of kart for the masters/big guys that doesn't exist today. I want it to have the cheapest price point possible with cheapest/most available replacement parts. I also want the baseline set-up to be very forgiving. I want to be fast no matter where I go with very minimal changes (I don't ask for much, right?).

Now, if I was designing a kart to sell to the market, I would make a 2-tiered approach. I would have the Cheap-o model (basically what I described above). Then I would have the Deluxe model with the upgraded brake system, fancy adjustments, sweet graphic kit, expensive seat, and custom powder coat. There appears to be plenty of room in the market for both. Guys like me who will never be able to buy a new kart because they are all $3k+ and then the guys who will buy every new bell and whistle because they "gotta have it".

Tuning is hard. As much of that a you can bake in to the baseline, the better off you are. If people can just sit down in the kart and be faster than their current kart, you would sell a bunch of them. I am still on an Arrow 4S in Lawson trim. No matter what i do over the course of a weekend, it seems like I always end up back at the Gary Lawson baseline by Sunday afternoon. It is almost always the fastest set-up. That's the feeling I would want out of a new kart.
 

Jimbo

A trial w/o witnesses is like racin w/o tech
I wonder if there is a market or opportunity for a kart manufacturer to produce a kart for bigger people.
Since the chassis would be different than "normal" maybe it would have to be it's own class.
It seems to me that a lot of times the "big guys" don't even consider karting because they just don't fit in the karts.
We have little karts for kids "kid karts" and we have Cadet chassis. Why not a big guy chassis?
 

Jimbo

A trial w/o witnesses is like racin w/o tech
I hate dropping spindle shims on the ground and loosing track of how many were on top and how many were on the bottom.
I've been doing this a long time and still do it occasionally.
A different (better) method of adjustment would be great.
 

Gab507

Member
I hate dropping spindle shims on the ground and loosing track of how many were on top and how many were on the bottom.
I've been doing this a long time and still do it occasionally.
A different (better) method of adjustment would be great.

Margay had a very nice way to adjust on their attempt at an oval kart, the Stryker. I don't know why it couldn't be included in a sprint chassis. It seems like currently they are happy with their Ignite program
 

sundog

Member
I'd like to see a kart that conformed to all the modern safety rules and had an extra vertical hoop on the front bumper to protect your feet
 

gary10

Member
Thanks for all the replies. Keep them coming. I'm always looking to see what the consumers are looking for. I know what I like but that doesn't mean that's what the majority want. If compromises can be made in certain areas that would please more people then great!
 

Kart43

Member
The fastest 4 cycle sprint chassis's are super soft and flexible they have a short life span with senior and adult drivers. After a few years they are tweaked and they don't stay straight after being on the table, they weaken quickly. That is the price of being quick on a new chassis.
 

gary10

Member
Kart43 what chassis is this you speak of? These statements have been said about Tony Karts in general but are overall not accurate. To stay somewhat on topic is this what you are looking for out of a kart?
 

cmac

Member
Gary:

You should be very happy with the response to this newly started thread--some very good points from people who are knowledgeable. Before I give you my observations I think as far as the basic design goes you are the most qualified person to decide on the critical design features (ie: geometry, materials to be used, etc.) to be utilized. To ask the rest of us about designing a LO206 chassis is akin to Michael Jordan asking a bunch of Jr. High kids for ideas on how to better dunk a basketball. Sure, he can ask the question, but is any response going to add much to what he already knows?

In regards to general design ideas and optional features, sure the rest of us can chime in and give some useful observations and/or opinions. So far, I would summarize the responses in general terms as two-fold: (1) make the chassis more accommodating to larger racers, (2) make sure it has most of the same design features as LTO karts have had for several years (ie: more & easier front end adjustments).

My racing buddy, Joel Negus is the owner and designer of Legend Racing Chassis. He has been doing this clear back to 1994 and his chassis, dirt and asphalt, have been competitive wherever they were raced. After an 18 year absence from 4 cycle sprint racing he has mentioned putting heim-joint adjustable front end geometry (like many Speedway karts have) on his personal chassis. So, perhaps that is an idea?

Here is a list of items I would probably consider if I was king for a day:
1) wider distance between seat struts for larger drivers.
2) engine side of frame wishbone widened to get a little further away from the clutch.
3) elimination of the 3rd bearing hanger
4) affordable light weight parts (ie: nerfs, & bumpers)
5) seat sliders with square tubing and clamps to avoid twisting.

Gary, I hope you find something useful in this reply.

CMac
 

Kart43

Member
I was not specifying a particular brand, I don't want to set off a storm. We had Tony Karts but that was before they really built one for low power they were actually quite stiff, but not speaking of the latest in the last 10 years. There are many 4 stroke specific karts out there today, fast ones are generally very flexible.
 

Jimbo

A trial w/o witnesses is like racin w/o tech
I've never seen a dirt oval chassis with welded seat struts. They all have seat struts that clamp on to the chassis and you can put them virtually where ever they work the best. However, many of the aftermarket seat struts are not very durable.
The really good aftermarket seat struts are more pricey. Often times the customer decides he will go with the cheap ones and then complain when they loose a race because they break, costing them a win.

Coyote really has a great method for mounting the front of the seat. You can move them left and right as well as forward or back.

Bully has some really great rear seat struts.

Just a couple of examples
 

Freezeman

Premium User
The only thing I dislike about clamp on seat struts is the bottom of the clamps become frame rail protectors. Thick ones act like brakes on the curbs.
 

Jimbo

A trial w/o witnesses is like racin w/o tech
Yes Freeze that's true.
The chassis mfg could design the seat strut receptacle into the frame rail and make various upper struts to accommodate different seat locations.
Bending welded on seat struts is not easy nor is cutting and rewelding them at a different angle.
There are other things that get damaged by going over curbs than just the bottom of the seat strut. Like the frame itself, sprockets and body work.
 

Jimbo

A trial w/o witnesses is like racin w/o tech
I also have an issue with welded on steering posts or the stub to slide the steering post shaft into.
Being in a fixed location sometimes complicates things.
 

gary10

Member
Hundreds of views with only a handful of comments. I'm looking for even little things that might seem "nit picky". Things like having the side pod bolts horizontal so the heads don't get ground off. Arrow style seat spacers. Return spring incorporated into the pedal. Brakes/pedals with multiple leverage points to alter pedal feel. These are little things I appreciate. What little things do you look for?
 

Gab507

Member
Clam shell axle cassettes similar to oval karts to speed up axle changes even if it's just a practice day. What about a seat strut that can be adjusted like a tie rod to raise and lower the seat. We experiment a lot on practice days to determine what works or how adjustments effect feel and anything that helps make adjustments quicker is a big plus.
 
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