Burris 33’s taking prep or not?

Just a general question. Is there a time when Burris 33’s take or reject prep? In other words, when applying prep can the effects of the prep change or not meet expectations based on the conditions of the tires?
 
Just a general question. Is there a time when Burris 33’s take or reject prep? In other words, when applying prep can the effects of the prep change or not meet expectations based on the conditions of the tires?
Yes infact most always with 33s once the track hits a certain point an unprepped ( NEVER ) will be the fastest, BUT the right set could be one of many EXAMPLE here in central Pa were lucky most all our tracks never dusty and grip up pretty well, To race the series racing going on here you need 2020 more fresh round cut set and more flat cut set, 2020 from early season round cut set, more flat cut set, 2019's the same, 2018's the same, and some of the cured stuff needs 30 cc of internal so I guess you could call them prepped, As long as it's moist tires of karts on track racing are dirty, OR it's moist but slicked over it requires some prep million $$$$$$ question is what and how much, If the track goes past that point and produces enough grip if you try to stay on a tire that's been prepped or you wipe before going out the tire will skate around losing forward drive. Bottom line Burris 33s are the most chemical sensitive tires there are.
 
Just a general question. Is there a time when Burris 33’s take or reject prep? In other words, when applying prep can the effects of the prep change or not meet expectations based on the conditions of the tires?

If they are skinned over from heat cycling.
Be sure to refinish your Burris before applying prep.

If there's dew on the tires, or they are wet. Water and oil repel one another. The tires MUST be dry to apply prep.

If you've got too much prep in the tire already, (or too much too quick,) it will be slow to take any more...the result is the prep just lays on the surface and won't get down in the tire. Let them cure out a couple of weeks, then refinish them and prep again (only if needed.) Some heat will help drive the prep in and evaporate off what's left on the surface, but heat doesn't need to be used to prep properly (in my opinion.) It should only be used as a last resort (ie pounding prep in at the last minute at the track - which is rarely the best way anyhow.

Putting prep on too heavy can also make it just lay on the surface of the tire.
Most base preps need to be applied in very thin wipes and allowed to dry between coats.
Re-applying too soon, or in too heavy of a coat will result in the tire becoming "greasy."

Think of applying base preps during the week the same as you would applying stain to fresh wood.
The first coat will go in quickly and dry very quickly. The next coat will take longer to go in and dry. Each subsequent coat will take longer and longer to dry.
One thick heavy coat is generally not the way to go with base preps that build bite in tires.
The way some prep chemicals are mixed, the good oils in the prep are mixed with a chemical which is intended to drive the oil down into the tire. The heavier oils will just lay on the surface of the tire after the other chemicals have long evaporated, if too heavy of a coat is applied. That's why thin coats/wipes work better in my experience.

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🏁Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
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31 years of service to the karting industry
Linden, IN
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 
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