Chain breaker tips

Just looking for any chain breaker tips. I've been practicing on an old chain and about half the time I end up with a really tight link or a misaligned pin that pushes the plate off the chain. Just curious if there are more idiot proof chain breakers or some hints to get more consistent good results.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Just looking for any chain breaker tips. I've been practicing on an old chain and about half the time I end up with a really tight link or a misaligned pin that pushes the plate off the chain. Just curious if there are more idiot proof chain breakers or some hints to get more consistent good results.
Show me the chain breaker. Show me the chain. Is it what they call "space chain"? I invented that thing that breaks and reassembles space chain. 1973 I think. 47 years later and it's still the standard. Kind of nice.
 

Menace61

Member
Just looking for any chain breaker tips. I've been practicing on an old chain and about half the time I end up with a really tight link or a misaligned pin that pushes the plate off the chain. Just curious if there are more idiot proof chain breakers or some hints to get more consistent good results.
After years of trying, and a few broken chains because I was creating the "weak link" I just gave up and began using the masterlink provided. Haven't had a single issue since.
 
Thanks Al - it's one of those where you lay the chain down in the track and push the pin out with one bolt and push it back in w/ the other.
One trick I saw that helps is to use the fat bolt to push the chain pin most of the way in and then use the bolt w/ the pin on it to do the last 2 mm or so - this seems to help avoid pinching the link tight. I'm playing with putting grease in the bottom of the breaker to help keep the outer plate aligned w/ the hole (sometimes it drops too far down). I get good results some of the time so I guess one solution would just be to buy a ton of chains and just keep batting .500 or so.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Thanks Al - it's one of those where you lay the chain down in the track and push the pin out with one bolt and push it back in w/ the other.
One trick I saw that helps is to use the fat bolt to push the chain pin most of the way in and then use the bolt w/ the pin on it to do the last 2 mm or so - this seems to help avoid pinching the link tight. I'm playing with putting grease in the bottom of the breaker to help keep the outer plate aligned w/ the hole (sometimes it drops too far down). I get good results some of the time so I guess one solution would just be to buy a ton of chains and just keep batting .500 or so.
The whole purpose of the Space Chain breaker is to avoid just exactly what you're saying. That's why I invented it, to cure the problem. Lots of people making those breakers, sounds like something is amiss. It's not a problem I ever had.
 

CarlsonMotorsports

Premium User
There are different quality chain break tools on the market as well. Some of the import ones are just horrible to use.
I still have my original from 30+ years ago and it works perfect every time. Who knows, it may even be one that Al made.
We sell one through our shop currently that is made in the USA and it is FAR superior to the import "junk." (Face it, if a tool cause more harm and aggravation than good - it's junk.)

Using a chain break tool requires patience. Don't get in a hurry, take your time, make sure everything is aligned as you press pins in and out of links. Working with clean chain helps too.
Have spare chain(s) made up of various numbers of links so that you don't have to break a chain at the track in a panic situation.

If you need a good quality chain break tool - give us a call.
-----
🏁Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
Carlson Motorsports on Facebook
31 years of service to the karting industry
Linden, IN
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 

Don K

Member
I have a chain tool like Al designed. I found using a small hex key the size of the inside of the chain inserted to act as a guide for the pin helped a lot in getting them in straight and smooth. Takes a little practice holding the chain, tool, guide key and then turning the push key to assemble but, you'll get the hang of it.

DK
 

Bumpy

Member
Just break the chain and use a masterlink. Put the closed end of the clip
in the direction of chain travel and you won't have a problem. I have
AL's invention to break and make chains. It gets loaned out at the track
for people to re-make their chains (with no masterlink) after their chain comes apart. :)
 
I have a chain tool like Al designed. I found using a small hex key the size of the inside of the chain inserted to act as a guide for the pin helped a lot in getting them in straight and smooth. Takes a little practice holding the chain, tool, guide key and then turning the push key to assemble but, you'll get the hang of it.

DK
My chainbreaker does not have the one side open so I can't put in a pin or guide (but this would help a ton).
 
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