chassis lead on the right rear for adjustment..????

onealg5

New member
still trying to find out what its used for and how it can be used good or bad. Other than alignment issues whats everyone thoughts good and bad also what exactly does it do. Ill add that im on a Triton and a charger magnum...thanks in advance.
 

XXX#40

2A supporter
not really lead/lag on the rear, more Yaw, it changes the path the rear tires take compared to the front, and how the RR is loaded
 

Max26

Member
if You move rr back and rear tires are not square to the chassis it does in fact put rear steer it the kart...
 

Max26

Member
If you move RF forward parallel to the frame it reduces load on corner entry, less weight transfer and will not unload LR as much. If you move LF forward parallel to the chassis ahead of the RF the kart will add load to the RF having more weight transfer making kart more aggressive on entry. When you move RR back the rear wheels are on the same axle. When the axle is no longer square in the chassis it will add rear steer. Effects of rear steer is the kart will turn easier it will scrub speed an straits.
 
It doesn't ad rear steer ...because it is the rear and because of axle the rear will travel straight ahead ...it will cause rear free up but mostly because of what happens on front of kart not cuz of rear steer ...left fron is carrying more load on corner entry which frees the back of chassis just my opinion but that's how I think of it
 

Ted Hamilton

Design Drafter / Racer
There is no "rear steer" in a kart, because there's not true suspension action allowing for active changing of the wheelbase. Instead, what it does is offset the front wheels relative to the rear, so instead of the rear wheels "following" the front wheels, the fronts are offset to the inside, and all 4 wheels would make a path on the ground if rolled through wet paint or something. It effectively changes the lever arms that the Cg is acting through. Whether this hurts or helps will be determined by what your setup was doing previous to the offset... It also causes a fundamental misalignment between the clutch drum and sprocket, as well as the brake rotor and caliper... I'd only use it as a band aid. You can accomplish the same thing without causing misalignments by using spacers on your front spindles and spacing out your rears differently. Again, I don't see any real advantage except to cure something your chassis isn't doing that it should... I'd be moving weights before I moved the axle and tires around...
 

XXX#40

2A supporter
If you move RF forward parallel to the frame it reduces load on corner entry, less weight transfer and will not unload LR as much. If you move LF forward parallel to the chassis ahead of the RF the kart will add load to the RF having more weight transfer making kart more aggressive on entry. When you move RR back the rear wheels are on the same axle. When the axle is no longer square in the chassis it will add rear steer. Effects of rear steer is the kart will turn easier it will scrub speed an straits.
You're confused
 

Max26

Member
It doesn't ad rear steer ...because it is the rear and because of axle the rear will travel straight ahead ...it will cause rear free up but mostly because of what happens on front of kart not cuz of rear steer ...left fron is carrying more load on corner entry which frees the back of chassis just my opinion but that's how I think of it
When the rear axle is not square (RR rearward) in the chassis it will cause the front end track to the left steering the kart from rear. It will reduce load on RR ...it is more of a alignment adjustment than a load adjustment in my opinion
 

Max26

Member
There is no "rear steer" in a kart, because there's not true suspension action allowing for active changing of the wheelbase. Instead, what it does is offset the front wheels relative to the rear, so instead of the rear wheels "following" the front wheels, the fronts are offset to the inside, and all 4 wheels would make a path on the ground if rolled through wet paint or something. It effectively changes the lever arms that the Cg is acting through. Whether this hurts or helps will be determined by what your setup was doing previous to the offset... It also causes a fundamental misalignment between the clutch drum and sprocket, as well as the brake rotor and caliper... I'd only use it as a band aid. You can accomplish the same thing without causing misalignments by using spacers on your front spindles and spacing out your rears differently. Again, I don't see any real advantage except to cure something your chassis isn't doing that it should... I'd be moving weights before I moved the axle and tires around...
You don’t need suspension to change to change wheel base you are manually adjusting it ... fixed rear steer ...
 

Max26

Member
On the left front tire when wheel is straight ahead that tire is not steering. When the rear of the Left front tire moves in closer to the chassis and the front of the tire moves out away from the chassis that tire is now steering... when you move RR rearward the distance from the tire to the frame changes also on the left rear due to being on the same axle ... so how can the car turn when you move (steer) the front tires but not the rear? Same effect just a fixed setting.
 

XXX#40

2A supporter
You don’t need suspension to change to change wheel base you are manually adjusting it ... fixed rear steer ...
you are not changing the wheelbase with a yaw adjustment, only thing you are doing is changing the offset
 

XXX#40

2A supporter
On the left front tire when wheel is straight ahead that tire is not steering. When the rear of the Left front tire moves in closer to the chassis and the front of the tire moves out away from the chassis that tire is now steering... when you move RR rearward the distance from the tire to the frame changes also on the left rear due to being on the same axle ... so how can the car turn when you move (steer) the front tires but not the rear? Same effect just a fixed setting.
it isnt steering, once you start forward the wheelbase is the same length, we set toe off the axle, you change the rear axle you have to reset toe.
changing the yaw on a kart isnt rear steer, Lead and lag is a front end adjustment, and your definition of that adjustment is off as well.
I wish I could find that drawing that Randy Major posted here many years ago you would then understand
 

XXX#40

2A supporter
Kart are built with the rear axle offset from the center-line, rear adjustment just changes that offset.
A kart is also built with the RS wheelbase 1/4-3/8 longer than the LS
 

Max26

Member
you are not changing the wheelbase with a yaw adjustment, only thing you are doing is changing the offset
If you move axle to to the (right or left ) that effects offset. When you move the rear axle rearward on the right rear the wheel base gets longer on the right and shorter on the left ... when you turn front tires to steer the kart the wheel base also changes getting shorter on the left and longer on the right causing it to steer... also the relationship from the inside of tire to chassis changes as does the front when you steer ...
 

Max26

Member
it isnt steering, once you start forward the wheelbase is the same length, we set toe off the axle, you change the rear axle you have to reset toe.
changing the yaw on a kart isnt rear steer, Lead and lag is a front end adjustment, and your definition of that adjustment is off as well.
I wish I could find that drawing that Randy Major posted here many years ago you would then understand
So if you set toe with axle square in the kart to 0 ... then you move rr axle rearward why do you need to reset toe? It is because the rear is steering... you made no change to the front ... when toe is off in the front the tires have changed direction causing it to steer... . when you move the rr of the axle rearward you are changing the direction of the tires causing it to steer . You are changing the alignment just like turning a tie rod...
 

Max26

Member
When you move the steering wheel you are changing the relationship between tires and chassis causing it to steer... . when you move just the right or left side on a fixed axle you are changing the relationship between the chassis and the tires causing it to steer . you can over think it if you want but it is basic...
 

XXX#40

2A supporter
So if you set toe with axle square in the kart to 0 ... then you move rr axle rearward why do you need to reset toe? It is because the rear is steering... you made no change to the front ... when toe is off in the front the tires have changed direction causing it to steer... . when you move the rr of the axle rearward you are changing the direction of the tires causing it to steer . You are changing the alignment just like turning a tie rod...
The rear isnt steering, put your toe lock in, move the rear axle back then roll the kart and see what happens, youre thinking about what happens statically, and not what happens when the kart is moving, once youre rolling the wheelbase is back to what it was originally but what the hell do I know, weve only been karting for 20 years and full scale 15 yrs before that, and I worked for and sponsored by a major kart chassis company for 9 years, so have at it.
 

XXX#40

2A supporter
When you move the steering wheel you are changing the relationship between tires and chassis causing it to steer... . when you move just the right or left side on a fixed axle you are changing the relationship between the chassis and the tires causing it to steer . you can over think it if you want but it is basic...
Youre the one not seeing it from your lack of knowledge of an offset kart, it isnt rear steer.... end of story
 
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