Clone Engines $50 or $500?

guitarman715

New member
So, I am looking for an engine to start racing this year. This will be my first year karting. I will be running Clone Medium with AKRA rules. I know seat time is more important, but honestly I don't want to waste money on a engine if I need one that is alot better. I just want to get something good. So on craigslist I see clone engines anywhere form $50 to $500. I have been goolging the crap out of this and I still dont really understand. If all the engines are supposed legal, they are gona be within a half horsepower than each other. So would I benifiet from having a higher dollar engine? I dont quite understand what would be the purpose of dropping $500 on an engine if it has the same HP. Please advise me, I am a noob, excuse my noobiness.
 
Some will be just stock some are blueprinted, your looking for an AKRA legal engine. Most blueprinted legal engines rum any place from $500-$1000 for a clone engine
 
Give me a call at your convenience. i am not attempting to sell you an engine. I am willing to inform you of what direction to go. 570-538-4263 Don Gordner This is my web site if you would like to know a little about me. www.dynodonkartengines.com
 
Dyno Don is awesome! He explained everything to me and I have a much much better idea on how these engines work and what is what. Thanks!
 
Just starting out, your best bet is to buy a legal engine for your class from a reputable builder.

IMHO.
 
Just starting out, your best bet is to buy a legal engine for your class from a reputable builder.

IMHO.

I believe the opposite, when just starting out, racers dont need an engine from one of the bigger builders, one from dyno cams or a kit motor would suit them better and keep the cost down. Racers dont need a $600+ engine to get seat time or for local racing, that is just wasting money. I belive he is on the right path by just looking for the cheapest engine he can find and put it on the kart to get seat time. He can buy one of those engines used, for say $200 race ready, and check it out to make sure it is legal and up to spec, and get the seat time he needs, learn how to make changes to the chassis and what they do, and everything else he needs to know, then when he feels like he has the basics of everything down and is ready to compete, step up to a better engine like one from a reputable builder like you suggested.

Think of it this way, would you spend $500 on an engine knowing you werent gonna be winning races with it anytime soon, or not expecting to win races with it? I highly doubt you would, unless you have more money than sense lol, no offense.
 
I haven't purchased and engine used yet from anyone here on Bobs or e-bay that I didn't need to spend money on to make it right. Did you ever hear of the old expression: Sell your used stuff to your competitors ? My suggestion to a guy starting out is to purchase a kit engine. That allows him to get the feel for assembly and when he is ready, he now has an engine that he can go further with. Some of the kit engines are really close to a full blueprint. so with that being said, I think a kit engine can be bought for around 300 dollars. That is not a bad deal for starting out in karting.
 
My Thing w/ a newbie is too '1st' find what his desire AND capibilities are, then groom a 'package' for him. I had a customer that called me for help on a 'used' motor that he bought that blew-up his 1st time out. He had few tools and equal in knowledge. Long story-short...got him goin...improved his knowledge/capibilities...kept money in his pocket...showing 'promise', then...quit after five races becuz of over-zeaious (stupid) drivers!! Moral of the story...."Never over-invest!"
 
I haven't purchased and engine used yet from anyone here on Bobs or e-bay that I didn't need to spend money on to make it right. Did you ever hear of the old expression: Sell your used stuff to your competitors ? My suggestion to a guy starting out is to purchase a kit engine. That allows him to get the feel for assembly and when he is ready, he now has an engine that he can go further with. Some of the kit engines are really close to a full blueprint. so with that being said, I think a kit engine can be bought for around 300 dollars. That is not a bad deal for starting out in karting.

Excellent advice: TS Racing and Dover Power both sell a kit engine that has some degree of blueprinting. I have bought and assembled a few. Doing so has really increased my knowledge of what makes them run well. I used to be intimidated about opening them up, now its all too familiar.
 
i love it!! the advise is spot on!! when i first started, i had guys coming out of the woodwork to sell me thier "championship winning, best of everything, can't go wrong, don't worry about it blowing up for years, starts first pull, will kill the competition" motors...nope....went and got me a predator and started getting seat time on a bare bones stock engine...then started having little things done...then took the big leap to building myself....and learning from all you guys on here! didn't loose a motor this year due to builder error....not one!! lost one due to a cracked block and a crack around the header stud...but not from builder error!!!

thanks guys!! all of you are the best!!
 
I believe the opposite, when just starting out, racers dont need an engine from one of the bigger builders, one from dyno cams or a kit motor would suit them better and keep the cost down. Racers dont need a $600+ engine to get seat time or for local racing, that is just wasting money. I belive he is on the right path by just looking for the cheapest engine he can find and put it on the kart to get seat time. He can buy one of those engines used, for say $200 race ready, and check it out to make sure it is legal and up to spec, and get the seat time he needs, learn how to make changes to the chassis and what they do, and everything else he needs to know, then when he feels like he has the basics of everything down and is ready to compete, step up to a better engine like one from a reputable builder like you suggested. I
Think of it this way, would you spend $500 on an engine knowing you werent gonna be winning races with it anytime soon, or not expecting to win races with it? I highly doubt you would, unless you have more money than sense lol, no offense.

I spent just a bit more than $500 on a complete, professionally built, legal, dynoed, broken-in engine that I didn't have to check out (gonna be real fun when the side cover comes loose after you did everything by the 'book' and then realized the 'book' left out a few pages. Don't ask me how I know this.) and all we did was put it on and run.
It was one less thing to have to worry about during the steep learning curve of chassis, tires, tires and tires.
It's just me.
Oh. We won 2 races out of 22.
 
i think that buying an engine from a builder would be good that way when you get beat you know it's tires and setup and know what to work on
 
there are arguments for and against a first year driver on buying used, new, stock or modified. depending on the experience level (and I ain't talking no street racing seat time!), it could be argued both ways....but if your just starting out....I think jumping in too fast with a built motor and no seat time could be a receipt for trouble! it's easy to apply too much power all at once without the benefit of experience and then everyone on the track is at risk. but then again, some people are naturals and can handle themselves very well!

bumpy...I can see what your saying....but I have to ask...what was the outcome on the other 20 races? consistency pays way more that a couple of wins and a lot of DNF's...that's just a statement, not meaning to sound condescending!!.....congrats on your wins and I wish you the best in your quest for more wins!! we only had one feature win this past season and with the new motors, looking at taking a couple more this coming season!!
 
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