Clutch Gear

MAS

Premium User
What is the exact benefit of dropping the front driver and changing the rear gear to get the same ratio you had with a higher tooth clutch driver?
 

OVALTECH1

Premium User
I’ll get corrected but I use the smaller driver any time the track is tight with a lot of momentum drop or the karts driver needs more off corner drive to make up for lost momentum. I feel the smaller the driver the quicker and snappier it is off a big rpm drop.
 

racing promotor

Moderator
What is the exact benefit of dropping the front driver and changing the rear gear to get the same ratio you had with a higher tooth clutch driver?
Every track has a best front driver size to making most potential speed, the shape size and amount of grip is what dictates what that will be for the class running, provided your on that now ( best size ) dropping front size down one the only benefit you may see is being able to hold your competition off better in the turns on the tighter turn smaller tracks even though your lap times all but stay the same. If you know your on the same driver as all the hot shoes leave front driver size alone then compare rear gear to them, If your higher by 2 or more provided you have no handing issue, your Tires are off OR your chassis is tight.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Base circles (look it up) do not increase proportionally to the tooth count. The more teeth on sprocket, and this may be hard to believe, the closer together they are. This means, if you go to the smaller sprockets, with the same ratio, the base circle ratio changes. A smaller gear set, will have a lower ratio than a larger gear set, just fractionally. The ratios pictured, by tooth count, are the same, but if you calculate the ratios of the base circles, they differ as a gear sets get bigger. Like I say, not by much, but it's there.
gear count v base circ.jpg
 
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