Dumb clutch question for Al or anyone.

paulkish

old fart
Dumb clutch question for Al or anyone.

Wouldn't it be easy to see clutch engagement and slip, by comparing axle rpm to engine rpm?
 
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Dumb clutch question for Al or anyone.

Wouldn't it be easy to see clutch engagement and slip, by comparing axle rpm to engine rpm?
I don't know about easy? I'm sure it's possible. You would need a device to measure the axle RPM and the engine rpm. Then you would need to tell that device what the gear ratio is. After that it's just a little math.
 
I was thinking maybe put a sensor on the RR bearing hanger and then micron or someone else might add it to their software. You could look at clutch engagement same as rpm or anything else. It sure would help knowing how your clutch engages. I think it would even show where peak torque occurred, assuming you would be able to see which clutch engagement speed caused the least drop in rpm. Even if it wasn't showing actual peak torque per say, What ever combination of things that created the least rpm drop, would be best. For a long time I've thought where you stressed drive line parts, makes a difference in performance. You might be able to relate lever length and rotating mass, to rpm.

It might once and for all settle the question asking if all like ratio's give the same performance, based on track conditions and anything else you may want to compare. I think it's a relatively simple solution to answer a whole lot of questions.

Thanks for the reply Al
 
what RPM drop?

I'm no mathematician. Wouldn't you be able to compare by a graph axle rpm and engine rpm?

I assume different mechanical configurations would make different looking graphs. This is a question I'm not big into math. If you made axle rpm go up the left side of a graph and engine rpm across the bottom to the right, wouldn't the line plotted show how things changed, because of clutch slippage and other things?

How you interpreted the change could be in many different ways. I'm thinking if you put one graph on top of the other, what ever mechanical configuration kept the highest axle speed per rpm, would be best. All I(think I) know about graphs is it's a way to look at and compare two different things. How you interpret what you see, I think would depend on your own experience level. One person may see nothing in it, but to another person it might be very revealing. no ... ?
 
I was thinking maybe put a sensor on the RR bearing hanger and then micron or someone else might add it to their software. You could look at clutch engagement same as rpm or anything else. It sure would help knowing how your clutch engages. I think it would even show where peak torque occurred, assuming you would be able to see which clutch engagement speed caused the least drop in rpm.
what drop in RPM???
 
digitron has a a jackshaft sensor that would accomplish this.
you would able to see the graph and or do the math but it would show what was needed as far as rpm along with the lap times to compare improvments or losses in lap times. Exmple: if the ratio was 4 to 1 and your turning the engine 8000 rpm and the axle was only tuning 1850 you know your losing 150 rpm to clutch slip.
 
what drop in RPM???

Al, hes talking about how much rpm the engine drops, or loses as you go thru the turns or corners on the racetrack. Some tracks you drop more rpm than others because the turns are tighter and you have to lift the throttle.
 
Al, hes talking about how much rpm the engine drops, or loses as you go thru the turns or corners on the racetrack. Some tracks you drop more rpm than others because the turns are tighter and you have to lift the throttle.
Thank you sir, I appreciate your time and trouble.
And I'm sure you're going to lose some RPM, depending on the turn radius, even if you don't lift.
There is a another place he could have been talking about dropping RPM and I wasn't sure which one he was referring to. Take for instance; coming off a tight turn where you have to lift, then you hit the gas and the clutch is slipping at your stall RPM, than the clutch locks up, the rpm's drop some, and you take off. In that instance, the drop in RPM may be caused by a lean condition. Couldn't this condition be cured with a larger low-speed jet?
If the data does not support the theory, get a new theory.
 
The rpms wont drop at engagenemt. The rpm acceloration rate will slow but rpm will still be raising. If they dropped at engagement the clutch would never lock up.
 
The rpms wont drop at engagenemt. The rpm acceloration rate will slow but rpm will still be raising. If they dropped at engagement the clutch would never lock up.
You’d be surprised.
If you would like me to explain to you where you’re wrong, just let me know.
Comments compliments criticisms and questions always welcome.
 
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