Fiberglassing a Body? ...Products?

karter13579

New member
I've got another complete body that needs some nose repair.
I'm trying to get information and insight on what I need, best products to use, just general information to repair the body myself.

My idea of what I need is:
*fiberglass (Not sure what kind or brand?)
*resin
*Hardener
*applicators
*bondo?

Any advice would be really appreciated.

Thanks.
 
I think you have it covered...get some disposable gloves and your there. Any auto store or local hardware store sells the kits.
 
Not sure what applicator your referring to but just a few days ago I used a small paint roller like you use to put tire prep on that I picked up at harbor freight, IMO it really worked well to smooth out the fiberglass and resin . Also you will need some sort of mixing container.
 
Also do the heavy glassing for structural integrity on the inside as muvh as possible and light cosmetic glassing on the outside. Just better for aesthetic purposes if your worried about them
 
Marine tex works good too, but I usually use the Auto parts kits, just need to use a sander to clean up the surrounding area. Acetone and Goop work real good to remove from your hands
 
I grind inside out with flat disk, makes a hell of a mess... Then do all my repair work on the inside. I end up just using my hand to lay the resin, no matter what I start with lol. I've done some serious repairs that came out awesome, if there was a market for it I would be all over it but by the time you figure materials and labor it's quicker cheaper and easier to buy a new nose. Nothing wrong with fixing our own stuff though
 
Get the fiberglass mat, not the cloth. Mat is the one that has the strands in many different directions, not woven like the cloth and much easier to work with.
 
Be sure to read the directions that comes with the kit. Make sure to have your repair pieces of mat material cut to size before you start mixing your resin. The resin sets-up fairly fast so you won't have a lot of time to work with it before it becomes difficult to manage. I use some cheap one or two inch paint brushes to apply the resin and press the air bubbles out. Maybe try a small test repair first to get the hang of it, before you tackle your actual body repair.
 
repair from the inside for sure ...you can always spray paint the inside of the body to hide any nasty spots you really dont feel like messing with. also when refinishing the outside I've always had best/closest to original results with marine gel-coat finishes ...use minimal fillers for best results all around
thrash it / glass it / trash it ...dont keep healing the lame horse after youve fixed it once in an area and it bites it again just eat it and get a new(er) one ...nobody likes flying fiberglass coming at them just because of a couple bumps on the track
 
Get the fiberglass mat, not the cloth. Mat is the one that has the strands in many different directions, not woven like the cloth and much easier to work with.

I actually find the mat to be alot messier to work with, because those strands keep sticking to your gloves, hands or whatever your using to apply the resin. I have had alot better luck with the cloth. Also, as for brand of the products to use, i like the Bondo brand of cloth, resin, hardner and everything that you can find at Advance Auto or Autozone stores. I pick up a gallon of the resin at a time for $30-35, which is enough to do a few bodies actually if you know what your doing. I have done alot of work on fixing bodies as they get torn up, until finally i just started adding an extra 1/4 to 1/2" thick layer of fiberglass to the whole body when i buy them new, especially the inside center of the nose. Definately reinforce the bottom lip of the nose where the front meets the bottom section, all the way around, as that is where alot of noses split right along that lip from what iv seen. Since thickening them up like i do, i can take a pretty hard hit and barley even get a scratch on the body. Molding on the nose to protect it, and graphic savers on the side panels, works great.
 
Be sure to read the directions that comes with the kit. Make sure to have your repair pieces of mat material cut to size before you start mixing your resin. The resin sets-up fairly fast so you won't have a lot of time to work with it before it becomes difficult to manage. I use some cheap one or two inch paint brushes to apply the resin and press the air bubbles out. Maybe try a small test repair first to get the hang of it, before you tackle your actual body repair.

definately take this advice. Alot of good info on this thread
 
I prefer the cloth myself, sometimes I will throw some mat over top just to keep the look similar and a little extra strength
 
Mat is for building thickness, not making the part stronger.
Individual layers of cloth laid in at different angles will be stronger than mat and thinner.
 
Acetone for cleaning up your tools works great.

If you have a hole in your body, put a piece of duct tape on the outside, trying to match the contour of the body. Glass from the inside, once it's dry remove duct tape and, for the most part, if you've rolled out the bubbles and don't have any voids it'll look pretty decent.

Mat is easier to work with if you don't have a roller to remove the air. The resin seems to penetrate it better compares to cloth. Keep your resin about room temp and it will penetrate the mat a lot easier as well. For small jobs a paint brush is all that's needed to push the resin into the mat - Dabbing it with the tip of the paint brush will do fine - Keep in mind you want the glass to have a Transparent look this is an easy way to identify if you have MOST of the air out.

Don't soak your mat in resin and get it all dripping wet - the key is to apply the least amount of resin possible. Resin does NOT give you strength it only adds weight.

If your looking for fiberglass tools and products try Composites One.

Oh and lastly - Do not put too much hardener in your resin. Too much hardener also causes the part to become brittle, or it won't fully cure out. How fast a part hardens or doesn't harden is relative to how much hardener you mix in. Here is a great Catalyst chart that will help you determine just how much hardener you'll need. Definitely take into consideration the ambient temperature when mixing your resin/hardener. The hotter it is the less hardener you'll need - If you do not adjust, as previously stated, you'll have very little time to apply your product and massage the air out. Have fun! (that's a joke, fiberglass is not fun, lol)

http://www.stickystuffsales.com/catalyst_chart.php
 
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here's what I haven't read. You take a small can that your brush will fit into, yes your using a brush, and fill that with enough acetone to cover the brissles. Do all your glassing for the first coats. resin, cloth, resin and more cloth. when you start to get a build up you can put your brush into the acetone and wait for the resin to setup. Knock off the high parts and anywhere you don't have enough, with some 80 grit, then you can proceed to build up. Now you will see why you put your brush into acetone. You don't need another brush. Shake out the excess acetone and work the areas again. Build up as needed. Also anytime you get enough resin into the cloth you can add several layers of cloth and tap into place with the brissles that have some acetone on them before you add more resin.
 
^^if you do that, just don't get sloppy with the acetone, it will break down the resin.

On a side note, if you ever do gel-coat work you can thin the gelcoat with acetone and spray it. The gelcoat will still harden with the acetone. Resin cannot be thinned with acetone, it will not cure.
 
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