firing point

Does anyone have a picture or a good discription of the point where the ARC flywheel fires? If so please post or message it to me. Thanks
Jim
 

sCREamnClones

New member
Does anyone have a picture or a good discription of the point where the ARC flywheel fires? If so please post or message it to me. Thanks
Jim
A good 'WAG' is abt when the magnet is centered with the coil plus abt 3-5degs, however....it vary's from engine to engine. (Don't 'bank' on it!) JMO
 

Jody / ARC Racing

Site Supporter
If it was purchased after 1/2013 the coil should fire when the leading edge if the magnet (the first line with the grey puddy) is in line with the right hand side of the coil. This may vary from coil to coil because some fire a little different. The best way is to point a timing light at the coil to see exactly where it fires.
 

PCMotorworks

New member
What kind of timing light should be used

If it was purchased after 1/2013 the coil should fire when the leading edge if the magnet (the first line with the grey puddy) is in line with the right hand side of the coil. This may vary from coil to coil because some fire a little different. The best way is to point a timing light at the coil to see exactly where it fires.
 

Jody / ARC Racing

Site Supporter
We use a standard Napa timing light. Some lights will not work but most will. When you put the clap on the plug wire look and see if it has a spark direction arrow, if so direct it as it states. Spin the engine and point at coil, if the light doesn't work turn the clamp arrow the opposite direction.
 
Setup a degree wheel on the pto side. Use it to mark tdc and where you would like it to fire on the flywheel and pick a reference point on the block. Then use a timing light to see where it fires from your mark. Roll it over to where it was firing and then look at your degree wheel. I do this on the bench with an electric starter during assembly.
 

alvin l nunley

Site Supporter
Very true, however...I wasn't 'assuming' he has a timing light and 'knowing' what he's after....jst say'n
I understand what you’re saying, and you’re right, but if he wants to know exactly where the ignition is firing, he needs one.
There are times when, if you want to measure something, you need the proper tools.

Comments, compliments, criticisms and questions always welcome.
 

DynoDon

Moderator
I am going to take you guys back to the really old days of the flathead. Do you remember when you could check the timing with a radio? The points would open and a clicking sound would be heard through the radio. Man,, that goes back a ways!!!!
 

sCREamnClones

New member
I am going to take you guys back to the really old days of the flathead. Do you remember when you could check the timing with a radio? The points would open and a clicking sound would be heard through the radio. Man,, that goes back a ways!!!!
I 4got all abt that one Don....that takes me way-back to my auto shop days in high school and a flathead Ford '60'! Now, that was 'hi-tech!! (about the time karting started btw)
 

swamprat

New member
I am going to take you guys back to the really old days of the flathead. Do you remember when you could check the timing with a radio? The points would open and a clicking sound would be heard through the radio. Man,, that goes back a ways!!!!

I remeber setting the timing on Triumps with cigarette paper in the points. as soon as you could pull the paper out that's when it fired. LOL
 

Halfbreed33

New member
How much difference can there be by setting the timing by aligning the flywheel notch to leg of magneto w/ a degree wheel or drop indicator and using a timing light w/ a degree wheel? I run modified stock block B&S flatheads. I also own a '39 Ford Deluxe Coupe with a 59B flathead with a 4" stroke Mercury crank, 77B Isky cam, Offy heads, dual holley 94's, fenton headers, smithy mufflers and a Vertex magneto. Like B&S flatheads, it does not have timing marks. I was taught to advance the timing til it "pings" then back off a bit and lock it down. Can't do that with with a B&S flathead.
 
Top