From outdoors to indoors

karter_14

Member
When going from outdoor racing to indoors, what do you guys do for cross weight? Same? Higher? Lower? small bull ring track.
 

Wes Snow

New member
I typically lower mine but have seen some friends have a lot of success not changing anything at all. It really depends on the layout of your out door track vs the indoor track you plan to run.
 

W5R

New member
Are indoor tracks generally more higher bite tracks than outdoors and that being the reason for lower cross? Or is there another reason for the lower cross? Would seem like less cross and more left would be what is needed for an indoor flat track
 
If you have never run indoors I would suggest to go watch a race before entering one.

I came from Iowa where they run indoors over the winter and if you like to tear up your equipment, indoor racing is the place to do it!
 

rebsfan4

New member
I've ran many indoor races and never tore up a thing. Then again I have. It's not a certainty that you will. You can tear up just as much outdoors. I've even ran a engine of Troy's (fastbraden11) and he got it back without a scratch on it. Wasn't any winnings attached to it though. LOL
 

W5R

New member
that is a ridicules statement........
i would have to agree. Just because your racing indoor doesnt mean your gonna be tearing up your stuff or like to tear stuff up. I have seen video's of alot of indoor racing and not seen alot of people getting their stuff tore up, but its hard to tell in a video if the tracks are more high bite stuff or low bite stuff. Iv never raced indoors before, this year is gonna be my first indoor rodeo but im looking forward to it. Just trying to get a good idea of what kind of changes need to be made when going from outdoors to indoor racing. The tracks i race outdoors here in ky arent really low bite tracks, but arent high bite tracks like down south either, i guess they are about in the middle. They start out low bite, but gain bite pretty quick as the races go on, the more karts on the track the more it bite up.

Im assuming you would do the same for indoor racing as you would for high bite racing, which would be lower the cross and raise the left side percentages, right?
 
I`m just saying go watch one before you race in one and get an idea of what it is like!
In Iowa they put up concrete barriers on the outside all the way around the track.
I`ve seen up to 8 karts more than once (during an afternoon and night session of racing) be on top of each other and into these concrete barriers.
If you spin out or get hit by other karts there is no where to go other than into a concrete barrier!
I don`t sell kart parts for a living, but if I did I would say my statement of tearing up equipment indoors was ridicules also. You sell a lot of parts and karts!
As the saying goes: A fool and his money are soon parted.
At least I know where not to buy parts!
 

flattop1

Dawg 89
indoor dirt should be no problem. indoor syrup you may needa little experience. track will be a little loose and bite up or improve as day goes on , sometimes it starts to get rough if not packed well as in rut up.
borkarter must been to the battle of the barn or mason city. been some close racing at both
 

RRloaded

New member
I agree that indoor racing can get ruthless, but I think its the talent that is there all at once. Generally speaking most people on here have their tracks they go to outdoors and its probably local racing(not knocking it). There isn't the type of talent at a local show as there is at indoor events, if for anything because of the amount of places to choose from when it gets cold out. From my experience when people think of the best in the sport, they tend to be that bump and run driver in nature because that's what wins in karts. The sport is what it is at this point and that part seems to be a bit unfortunate to me because I don't remember it always being that way.
 
When going from outdoor racing to indoors, what do you guys do for cross weight? Same? Higher? Lower? small bull ring track.
In my experience, lower left percentage and lower cross to help transfer. It is sometimes necessary to raise the back of the seat 1 to 2 inches to help weight transfer as well. These are all statements related to racing on dirt. Racing on syrup is an entirely different ballgame.
 
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WILLIEBEZ

New member
In my experience, lower left percentage and lower cross to help transfer. It is sometimes necessary to raise the back of the seat 1 to 2 inches to help weight transfer as well. These are all statements related to racing on dirt. Racing on syrup is an entirely different ballgame.
Finally, someone is addressing your question logically. If your kart is handling well on a larger outdoor track, you may be able to stay with the same cross, but you're probably going to have to reduce your left side percentage. Especially if you're on a high left setup outdoors. You won't have the momentum in the corners due to the reduced speeds, so weight transfer will become a problem. We tuned this at the track by moving weight from the left side of the seat, straight across to the right side. Raising the seat will help too, but we didn't need to at the time. Be sure to increase your rear stagger, probably more than you ever thought you would. We were at 1 3/4 at Batesville, Ms a few years back, so be prepared. With the correct stagger and enough right side transfer, you should be able to carry better corner speed without having to stop and go.
 
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