Help with my 212 Predator on Coleman Goat

DirtyOldMan

New member
Okay, reading these threads are like trying to understand a foreign language to me.. I blew up the engine on my Coleman Tote goat and just got my new Predator 212cc to install. I really do not have a desire to go fast as I am only using this machine for hunting. How can I add a bunch of torque without getting in over my head?
 

flattop1

Dawg 89
No free lunchs in that respect .
Adjusting the governor would be a simple change . More usable rpm .
The 301 cc would be more torque but not a direct fit .
What use mountain , desert , swamp or flatland ?
 

Bumpy

Member
Torque (pulling power) could be increased by lowering the overall final drive ratio,
less teeth on the motor sprocket, more teeth on the rear sprocket.
Top speed would suffer.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Okay, reading these threads are like trying to understand a foreign language to me.. I blew up the engine on my Coleman Tote goat and just got my new Predator 212cc to install. I really do not have a desire to go fast as I am only using this machine for hunting. How can I add a bunch of torque without getting in over my head?
It's really pretty simple, Mill the head. Compression is the Holy Grail. Depending on how much you increase the compression, you may have to go to a higher octane fuel, maybe a colder spark plug, maybe richer carburetor settings. New jetting. Don't go overboard. One jet sizes, both low-speed and high-speed, from stock, is quite a bit.
 

DirtyOldMan

New member
No free lunchs in that respect .
Adjusting the governor would be a simple change . More usable rpm .
The 301 cc would be more torque but not a direct fit .
What use mountain , desert , swamp or flatland ?
Mountain. I bought the 301 but there was no way it was fitting without chopping my frame and I did not want to mess with that.
 

DirtyOldMan

New member
Torque (pulling power) could be increased by lowering the overall final drive ratio,
less teeth on the motor sprocket, more teeth on the rear sprocket.
Top speed would suffer.
I really like this idea, where do I find new sprockets and how do I know what sizes to get? I was reading that a 6:1 ratio is needed. How important is that? I am totally fine losing speed. I just want to pull..
 

DirtyOldMan

New member
It's really pretty simple, Mill the head. Compression is the Holy Grail. Depending on how much you increase the compression, you may have to go to a higher octane fuel, maybe a colder spark plug, maybe richer carburetor settings. New jetting. Don't go overboard. One jet sizes, both low-speed and high-speed, from stock, is quite a bit.
There we go with that foreign language.. 😂😂😂 All of these sound awesome but I would not know where to start..
 

flattop1

Dawg 89
mcmaster carr , grainger, fasanal ,or a bearing industrial supply.
one tooth smaller on the front or small gear and 8 or 10 bigger on the axle gear . if space allows .
 

Bumpy

Member
I'm a glutton for punishment.
Couldn't find an exploded diagram but this is what I gleaned from the parts list.
Looks like the CT200U (your model ?) uses a MaxTorque type clutch with 10teeth.
That goes to a jackshaft with 20T then over to a 10T and down to the wheel sprocket at 50T. So your final drive
ratio is 5 to 1. Five turns of the engine gives one turn of the tire. It's 420 (?) Chain.
I found a 60T 420 sprocket on eBay - $45. Which would give you 6:1.
eBay also has an 8T sprocket that may fit the jackshaft at the 10T.
I can't do the math with the 8T replacing the 10T on the jackshaft. o_O
 

flattop1

Dawg 89
yea 8 teeth is prolly too smal . The 60 would be a plus , and a good start .
Could bump the 20 on the jackshaft up if the other adjustment did not do enough .
 

Bumpy

Member
So did I get the 5:1 wrong too ?
I see the 10T engine to 20T jackshaft as 2:1 but then
the other side of the jackshaft is 10T so that ratio 1:2
canceled out the 2:1. Then 50T wheel/axle
with 10T driver as 5:1 overall.
Looked like to me all they were doing with the jackshaft
was getting chains to line up.
My eyes glazed over looking at AL's chart.
I don't do jackshafts.
 

95 shaw

Premium User
Nothing changes if gears are on the same shaft.
The 20 tooth driven and the 10 tooth driver on the same shaft are turning the same rpm. So no ratio changes on the shaft.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
So did I get the 5:1 wrong too ?
I see the 10T engine to 20T jackshaft as 2:1 but then
the other side of the jackshaft is 10T so that ratio 1:2
canceled out the 2:1. Then 50T wheel/axle
with 10T driver as 5:1 overall.
Looked like to me all they were doing with the jackshaft
was getting chains to line up.
My eyes glazed over looking at AL's chart.
I don't do jackshafts.
Maybe it is a little confusing to the novice. Let's say you have 10t on the Jack shaft and 50 on the axle, that's 5 to 1, multiply that times the engine to Jack shaft, 2.0, and you have 10.0. If you leave the engine and gas sorry Jack shaft gears blank, at the intersection of 10 and 50, you'll see 5.0.
Sorry if it's confusing. I'd love to improve on it if possible.Oh yeah I'm waiting
 
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