I have a chassis question for the chassis gurus on here.

paulkish

old fart
Do you think it is a must to provide weight to operate the RF tire, from the LR area of the kart? I realize when in the process of slowing down you would normally expect to get some help operating the RF from the LR area. But thought it will happen, is it a must?

That's leading to asking, do you think in most cases enough weight could be supplied from the LF area of the kart to operate the RF?

I'm hoping for a yes answer on both questions which would support an idea I have, but ain't sure what I'll get.

thank you


paul
 
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paulkish

old fart
Thanks for the help. I read my original post, found the confusing part and corrected it.

Here's what I fixed. I changed the word 'well' to be 'when' in the sentence starting, "I realize when in the".

It should end all confusion and hopefully get some answers.
 

paulkish

old fart
In case the jest of the question is not all that clear to some, this should help. The front and the back of the chassis do two things or have two things done to them, together and separately. The first is both the front and back need to turn or be turned. The second is through weight transfer and mechanical movement they both will effect each other. The thing to recognize is because the front and the back are connected both physically and dynamically, the front will effect the back and the back will effect the front. I believe the more you can get the front and the back to each work independently, the more over all speed will be available. If the thought is correct, then there is speed to be had doing anything that will allow the RF to operate as necessary, without help from the back.

With the indoor season it becomes obvious under certain track conditions, the need to operate the RF from the LF area is not only possible but mandatory. What I'm proposing takes the obvious one step further, in possibly providing a reason to carry the same thought process on to low grip situations. There's an obvious shift in chassis design towards being able to hold weight towards the LR corner. I think what I'm asking depending on how it's answered, may lead to new ways of holding weight at the LR. But you won't be able to hold weight at the LR corner, if it's needed to make the RF corner function.

Kart chassis not only are but have moved in design to enhance function at the LR corner. I think my BS over the years on here about how a staggered solid axle works and the need and way to control weight on the LR, if you want to get the back to rotate or steer, has been a factor in altering overall thinking about stuff. Frankly I think if kart chassis are indeed moving towards or have already moved towards a softer LR area, it's because of new general overall understanding out there of how a staggered solid axle works.
 
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JPMKarting

Site Supporter
Frankly I think if kart chassis are indeed moving towards or have already moved towards a softer LR area, it's because of new general overall understanding out there of how a staggered solid axle works.

Yep....your about 8 years behind
 

paulkish

old fart
I guess I need to ask the question again.

Do you think it is a must to provide weight to operate the RF tire, from the LR area of the kart?
 

Charliemac115

New member
To somewhat answer your question no you want have to go out of your way to try to do anything special to make your RF work. Loading on the RF is controlled by RF camber and caster and LF spindle monument, chassis design and weight transfer.

At corner entry the RF spindle will move in a upward arc causing it to dive and will also unload the LR slightly. at the same time the LF spindle will move down at a arc causing it to push weight over to the RF and RR tires. I call this mechanical weight jacking and the amount can be controlled by a combination of your caster and camber settings.

As the kart enters weight starts to shift into motion caused by centrifugal force and the mechanical weight jacking that just occurred in the spindles loading the RF tire and RR. The opposite effect is happening to the left side.

So picture all of this in your head and you'll se that yes you do have to set your kart up to load the RF but it's all just standard setup principles.

Hope I could help put some light on the subject and good luck.

Also yes it is necisary to take LR weight to load the RF but how much weight you use drone the LR is controlled by front end settings and weight percentages. Newer kart unload a lot less weight from the LR to achieve proper RF loading
 

rebsfan4

Member
To somewhat answer your question no you want have to go out of your way to try to do anything special to make your RF work. Loading on the RF is controlled by RF camber and caster and LF spindle monument, chassis design and weight transfer.

At corner entry the RF spindle will move in a upward arc causing it to dive and will also unload the LR slightly. at the same time the LF spindle will move down at a arc causing it to push weight over to the RF and RR tires. I call this mechanical weight jacking and the amount can be controlled by a combination of your caster and camber settings.

As the kart enters weight starts to shift into motion caused by centrifugal force and the mechanical weight jacking that just occurred in the spindles loading the RF tire and RR. The opposite effect is happening to the left side.

So picture all of this in your head and you'll se that yes you do have to set your kart up to load the RF but it's all just standard setup principles.

Hope I could help put some light on the subject and good luck.

Also yes it is necisary to take LR weight to load the RF but how much weight you use drone the LR is controlled by front end settings and weight percentages. Newer kart unload a lot less weight from the LR to achieve proper RF loading

Actually karts work around centripetal force. Everything else looks though. :)
 

Ted Hamilton

Helmet Painter / Racer
The sprint karts were starting to experiment with large scrub radius values and less caster to achieve the weight jacking. It was revealed that the inside front tire was doing a lot more in the turn than previously supposed. I wonder if that would apply to LTO karts too.... Obviously the waist and front end geometry determine the behavior of the interaction between the legs of the triangle between LF, RF, and LR. I've thought of several innovations to kart chassis front ends that aren't currently being done to control that movement, but I don't have the facilities to make and test 'em, so they remein theoretical exercises at this point.
 

rebsfan4

Member
Rebsfan4 seriously I try to help and you wanna bash one little word I wrote? Whatever it is what it is. merry Christmas

I wasn't bashing. If I was bashing I would tell you you were wrong about all kinds of stuff. I simply made an observation. Sorry it upset you so bad. This is the very reason why I don't post on here anymore.
 
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