Nitrogen

paulkish

old fart
Air has water in it and it's the water which expands and raises tire pressure out on the track.
Nitrogen has no water in it.

Water in a soap mixture is also why you never want to mount tires with soapy water.

There are air dryers you can buy to get the water out of air for inflating tires, but it's expensive as heck.
The nitrogen tank can also run air tools for you instead of having an air compressor.

Water in the air you use to inflate your tires with is not always a bad thing.
Sometimes especially car racing you can put a tire on with next to no air to try to get immediate grip and then after the tire heats up pressure builds for use the rest of the race. You won't find it being done very often if at all kart racing.

On a slick track car racing we might put as little as 3#'s of moist air in a left rear going out for the feature.
But again it's not the norm.
 

racing promotor

Moderator
What is the advantage over normal air?
For me I'd say it's more a personal preference than an advantage, it's drier and not supposed to raise pressures as quick or as much, but if you run internal prepped tires there's not much difference, for me not worth the added cost and hassle of filling tanks, yet alone hauling around a pressurised tank.
 
You will get more of an accurate temperature gain in your tires with nitrogen then regular air from the air compressor. I changed over to it about 5 years ago and will never go back to compressed air.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
I always used CO2. It comes in a much smaller and lighter tank made of aluminum. Much lower pressure(250 psi) so it's safer. Last about as long as nitrogen tank. Like nitrogen there's no water.

At 250 psi, CO2 stors as a liquid. The pressure drops almost instantly as it leaves the bottle so it becomes a gas. The regulator is cheaper than a nitrogen regulator.
 

Pete_Muller

Moderator
Al,

point of interest: (from Linde gas company)

"------- CO2 is transported, stored and handled in liquid form, either at ambient temperature (in cylinders or non-insulated storage tanks at a pressure of 45-65 bar) or refrigerated (in insulated tankers and storage tanks) at temperatures between -35°C and -15°C and pressures of 12 to 25 bar.--------"

PM
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Al,

point of interest: (from Linde gas company)

"------- CO2 is transported, stored and handled in liquid form, either at ambient temperature (in cylinders or non-insulated storage tanks at a pressure of 45-65 bar) or refrigerated (in insulated tankers and storage tanks) at temperatures between -35°C and -15°C and pressures of 12 to 25 bar.--------"

PM
My CO2 tanks were not insulated, were about 2 feet tall, less than 12 inches in diameter, and I was told the pressure only turn the lights off but all will in – you will and a will and was 250 psi. One tank lasted almost a week of normal usage at the races. Air tools and tires.
 

flattop1

Dawg 89
Beverage and beer dispensing .
 

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Jim46

Member
If you live in a humid area Houston or Miami. It's hard to get dry air in your tank . If you live in Arizona- use air
 
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