PVL vs. ARC Flywheels

old 66

New member
Ok getting a jump start on next year . Is there a real advantage ( hp. etc. ) using the ARC flywheel over the PVL ? My thoughts are if I can save a few bucks here and there . then why not , This is a AKRA build
 

sCREamnClones

New member
Ok getting a jump start on next year . Is there a real advantage ( hp. etc. ) using the ARC flywheel over the PVL ? My thoughts are if I can save a few bucks here and there . then why not , This is a AKRA build

Which 'ARC' flywheel are you trying to compare w/the PVL? The PVL is a nice unit for the price! What 'AKRA' class are you running?
 

W5R

New member
The pvl wheels are as good as any other aluminum flywheel out there and are less than half the cost of most. They are a cast aluminum instead of billet, but that is not a big deal at all. The pvl advantage is that they come with 28* timing built into them, while most others have 24 I believe. The pvl does weigh just a little more than the billet flywheels do, but that can be an advantage also on bigger tracks where you hardly lift the throttle, it would help keep your momentum going in my opinion. I have used the pvl since I have been running AKRA Clone, and love mine, I wouldn't trade it for any of the more expensive wheels. It also has a steel hub in the center that has threaded holes for a flywheel puller, while some of the billet wheels do not have the steel hub and are easy to tear up if you aren't careful when removing the flywheel. Just my own personal opinion, I'm sure some will disagree.
 

JPR57

Site Supporter
The ARC comes with 32 degrees of timing (HP+), has threaded holes for a puller, uses the strongest magnet available (HP+), is CNC machined from a solid billet core not casted Aluminum with a steel insert then machined like the PVL and yes that is a big deal because the fins will not break off, it weighs 3.5lbs, the PVL is 3.8lbs, the ARC is SFI certified, the PVL is not, the ARC is made in the USA, the PVL is not, the PVL cost $60-70 from most shops and the regular price of an ARC Flywheel is $100 but this weekend they are marked down 10% and you get 20% off UPS groung shipping. Also our flywheel puller works with most every flywheel out there that has the holes for a puller.
 
I have used countless ARC parts. Flywheels, rods, steering racks, cranks, etc.... I will use them again. Darn nice stuff. Is their flywheel better than the PVL? I think so. Does it make more power? Probably not. Does "made in USA" mean anything to me? Yes. Would I change a few things about thier products? Yes. Call them and tell them. Be courtious. They will listen. Go with the ARC. By the way ARC, would love to see a 390 flywheel that will take the stock fins AND has starter ring gear. Would be cheaper and easier to make because no fin machining. Could start with a smaller billet blank too. Just saying.
 

sCREamnClones

New member
If my customer tells me he prefers 'ARC'....ARC it is! If he is 'bartering' w/me....PVL it is! Fin's are a noice-level concern.
 

old 66

New member
Thanks guy's I have a ARC on my other motor with no complaints . Just thought I would ask for opinions . USA is very much a concern so with that said ARC it is .Sorry I didn't relize the PVL was imported
 

W5R

New member
Just because something is imported does not mean it is automatically an inferior product to something made here in the USA. There are plenty of racers who use the PVL flywheels and have zero complaints or problems just like there are people using the ARC flywheels with zero problems or complaints, and there are also those who use both and have had problems or complaints with the products. No matter what product you have, there will always be people having some sort of issue with it, nothing is made perfect no matter where it is made or imported from. I know i would much rather pay $60 for a flywheel and $5 for a timing key and put the other $40 towards tires or other things i need than to spend $100-150 on a shiny bettter looking flywheel with just 4* more timing built into it. The PVL is a great choice for those who are on a budget.
 

mikey56

New member
arc 6619 flywheel.....large fins, light weight (compared to stock), easily lapped to the crank. pvl flywheel....very thin fins that are prone to breaking with the slightest tape...easy to lap to the crank..... i bough both...had no issues with the arc.....took great care to put the pvl on my other motor and "tinged" one of the fins when i was turning the motor to get better leverage....fin snapped off close to the main part of the flywheel. smoothed that out and snapped the opposite fin and smoothed it out...did my best to make sure the balance was right....first time out? something got into the shroud and snapped another fin (we use a electric starter). had this happen once or twice more....then the block cracked and we rebuilt the motor with a 6619 arc flywheel. pvl is alright....but I'll stay with arc because of the durability.
 

sCREamnClones

New member
One of the Best attributes of the PVL is the steel. 28* hub. I just switched a 3rd customer over from the 'old' 24* ARC billet flywheel becuz of damaged keyways. The new 32* ARC product(s) are a great idea and are excellent in Quality! I will use them on my alky motors needing 'more' timing. However...when the 'PVL' will get the job done for much <$$, that will be my 'personal' choice. In regards too 'SFI'....It doesn't make my kart go faster! :) (oh yeah....Grossly 'stepped' keys are what destroys keyways) JMO
 

JPR57

Site Supporter
70% of damaged key ways are caused by the keys not being installed correctly. 25% because the flywheel was not properly lapped or torqued and the remaining 5% is because foreign material interrupted the mate (not cleaned). The key should run parallel to the shaft not the taper. If the key is higher on the engine side it will not allow the flywheel and crank tapers to mate properly, it should not stick up at all on the engine side of the taper. The key should be higher on the thread side of the shaft. This is the whole reason why we do not run keys, its only job is to hold the flywheel in place so the wheel and crank tapers mate up while being torqued. The key does not nor will not hold the flywheel from spinning, that is the tapers job. Lap the wheel using a medium compound, clean the wheel and shaft very well and torque to a minimum of 60 ft/lbs. Some use 80 to 90 ft/lbs. True SFI will not make your kart faster, but ABS brakes, air bags nor seat belts make your car faster either. It just gives you piece of mind.
 

sCREamnClones

New member
70% of damaged key ways are caused by the keys not being installed correctly. 25% because the flywheel was not properly lapped or torqued and the remaining 5% is because foreign material interrupted the mate (not cleaned). The key should run parallel to the shaft not the taper. If the key is higher on the engine side it will not allow the flywheel and crank tapers to mate properly, it should not stick up at all on the engine side of the taper. The key should be higher on the thread side of the shaft. This is the whole reason why we do not run keys, its only job is to hold the flywheel in place so the wheel and crank tapers mate up while being torqued. The key does not nor will not hold the flywheel from spinning, that is the tapers job. Lap the wheel using a medium compound, clean the wheel and shaft very well and torque to a minimum of 60 ft/lbs. Some use 80 to 90 ft/lbs. True SFI will not make your kart faster, but ABS brakes, air bags nor seat belts make your car faster either. It just gives you piece of mind.
I don't discount anything of which you say...but, suggest you put 'these' instructions w/ your product as 'most' of my problems come from other peoples mis-givings. I shall allow SFI 'tag'. (I just hope it doesn't cost me too-much) :)
 

astglenn

Member
ARC: A guy takes a billet of high order alloy that he cuts to length. The he places it into an American built Haas ( I hope) VF series mill and clamps it into a work holding fixture that he made right there in the machine shop. The same human being, collecting an American work force pay check, then touches off his tool changes and dry runs his machines program that was very likely generated on American produced Solid Works and VectorCam. Every once in awhile, the machining gods exercise their sense of humor and for no reason at all, he ends up with a few bad parts and find himself speaking in angelic tongues. Until that billet has a keyway broached into it and the polisher is happy, some American has ownership of the thing. The quality of ARC parts speaks for itself. Obviously, someone is proud of making their parts and rightfully so. I could fight off a gorilla with the thing on Friday, drive fence posts with it on Saturday and install it on a crank and race it Sunday. Durable don't begin to describe it.

PVL: Great part. Different story. A mold is machined. Usually, these molds come out of China. Yes, even the Germans are looking at value added outsourcing. The process is one of automation, pressure casting, stress normalizing, and good old fashion German engineering excellence. Direct human labor is minimized. That is the big cost driver in pretty much anything these days. It is adequately durable, totally anonymous, and damn ugly. It is also less expensive and gets the job done just fine.

I like the ARC program. It is where I prefer to spend my money. Nothing against the PVL stuff, it is just fine for its intended purpose.
 

JPR57

Site Supporter
Our keys do come with instructions. This topic is going to be my next tech up date on our Facebook page.
 

DirtyDan

Member
Art vs. Function

The ARC flywheel is a beautiful piece of art IMHO. The PVL not so much. The steel hub is a nice feature. I have one of both. Can't tell any difference in performance between motors. I lap mine to the crank, torque to 65 ft/lbs and run without a key (no key reaches where I am timed in either wheel anyway ;)

Time may tell the significance of the steel core if the cranks have to be removed and reinstalled very many times. We should buy American when ever we can. My $0.02.

Be safe,
DD
 
Top