Ratcheting hub?

flattop1

Dawg 89
ratcheting and free wheeling both different and I believe are used on different sides of chassis. braking is still an issue with either.
 
Wow thats news to me also, never heard of such a thing. But in question to the front stagger, Im thinking it would still be necessary for weight transfer, at least in my thinking, I may be wrong
though
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Nothing new, I built a sprint kart back in 1972 that had one way clutch bearings in both rear wheels. Of course I had to have breaks on both wheels, (stopping the axle didn’t slow the kart down one bit.) but it worked just fine. Going into the corners was really different. You’d be surprised how much you use the engine braking when stopping. When there is none, it’s a whole new experience.
I had the bearings in the wheels and the axle would drive the inside wheel, (in turns) and let the outside wheel overrun the axle speed. Worked great pushing the kart thru the pits, no effort at all to push the kart and turn it. Let off the gas down the straight and the engine RPM would drop down to an ideal and people in the pits would think you had lost a chain. Thing is, when you turn in a sprint kart, the inside wheel is off the ground, and you get drive from the outside wheel. On a big radius turn, when the inside wheel would be on the ground, lots of help, but not in the tight turns.
On an LTO, you would have to put the bearings in the wheels backwards, so the inside wheel could turn slower than the axle. You could keep that inside wheel on the ground, more side bite, but no drag on the engine in the corners from the wheels turning different RPMs. You wouldn’t really need stagger except for weight transfer.
But what the heck, if it works, they would just make a rule against it. In fact they did just that in IKF.
 

BrendanFitz #73

New member
Nothing new, I built a sprint kart back in 1972 that had one way clutch bearings in both rear wheels. Of course I had to have breaks on both wheels, (stopping the axle didn’t slow the kart down one bit.) but it worked just fine. Going into the corners was really different. You’d be surprised how much you use the engine braking when stopping. When there is none, it’s a whole new experience.
I had the bearings in the wheels and the axle would drive the inside wheel, (in turns) and let the outside wheel overrun the axle speed. Worked great pushing the kart thru the pits, no effort at all to push the kart and turn it. Let off the gas down the straight and the engine RPM would drop down to an ideal and people in the pits would think you had lost a chain. Thing is, when you turn in a sprint kart, the inside wheel is off the ground, and you get drive from the outside wheel. On a big radius turn, when the inside wheel would be on the ground, lots of help, but not in the tight turns.
On an LTO, you would have to put the bearings in the wheels backwards, so the inside wheel could turn slower than the axle. You could keep that inside wheel on the ground, more side bite, but no drag on the engine in the corners from the wheels turning different RPMs. You wouldn’t really need stagger except for weight transfer.
But what the heck, if it works, they would just make a rule against it. In fact they did just that in IKF.

That's cool al. Maybe someone should try it on an LTO kart
 

PD Power

New member
The ability of one rear wheel to turn, independent of the other is a violation of all principles of karting....as is suspension on a kart.
Furthermore it is very dangerous.
I saw one friend of mine, running one of the bearings, attempt to cut back a bit, to the right. The kart flipped and broke
his shoulder. He was out of work for 6 weeks.

Because of the rather odd, and unprincipled rules of the Unlimiteds, they may be legal there. The Unlimited class would be
the very most dangerous class to use this device.
Any track, noticing the use of this will immediately withdraw the kart from the track.
 

rainman

Premium User
The ability of one rear wheel to turn, independent of the other is a violation of all principles of karting....as is suspension on a kart.
Furthermore it is very dangerous.
I saw one friend of mine, running one of the bearings, attempt to cut back a bit, to the right. The kart flipped and broke
his shoulder. He was out of work for 6 weeks.

Because of the rather odd, and unprincipled rules of the Unlimiteds, they may be legal there. The Unlimited class would be
the very most dangerous class to use this device.
Any track, noticing the use of this will immediately withdraw the kart from the track.

Agree. It breaks the main principle of karting.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
http://mikeclementsracing.com/accessories.html

Makes me wonder when it engages if it would shake a kart. I would think the free one would give you better speed on the straight
Seen it on 1/4 midgets for years
About the only time I noticed it was even there was when rolling the kart around the pits, or letting off the gas and breaking into a corner.
Comments, compliments, criticisms and questions always welcome.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Furthermore it is very dangerous.
I saw one friend of mine, running one of the bearings, attempt to cut back a bit, to the right. The kart flipped and broke
his shoulder.
Unlike you, I have driven one, sprint and enduro, and I never saw what you’re talking about.
Comments, compliments, criticisms and questions always welcome.
 

blackwell42

New member
A ratcheting hub will lock up down the straights giving positive traction making the kart feel normal. Now if you run the axle sleeves that shadow karts sells then its a totally different feeling kart feels like driving a late model down the straights. The ratchet hub will unlock in the corner helping the kart roll easier and free thru the corner. With the sleeves you put sleeves on both sides of the hub and remove the keyway to allow it to freespin. It will free the kart up in the corners and also make it feel free on the straights. If you run either maker sure to take a few teeth off the gear bc it will overload with rpm bc the kart is so free.
 
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