Resurfacing tires

CarlsonMotorsports

Premium User
Ya, what tire and what track surface.
I prefer a courser finish on looser/dustier track surfaces.
For harder/cleaner track surfaces, I finish sand with a finer grit.
Since a lot of Maxxis tracks are clean and bite up good, I think that's why you'll see guys finish sand Maxxis finer.
For a lot of us up norf, we run on black dirt with low or no bite, and the racing line can stay marbly all night - that's when a courser finish may be an advantage. I plateau finish everything as I don't want those course sipes to tear or feather back if the track gets good all of the sudden.

General rule for tires that leave our shop:
120 - 180 - 220g Burris for no bite tracks
220 - 400g for Maxxis.
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🏁Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
Carlson Motorsports on Facebook
31 years of service to the karting industry
Linden, IN
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 
Ya, what tire and what track surface.
I prefer a courser finish on looser/dustier track surfaces.
For harder/cleaner track surfaces, I finish sand with a finer grit.
Since a lot of Maxxis tracks are clean and bite up good, I think that's why you'll see guys finish sand Maxxis finer.
For a lot of us up norf, we run on black dirt with low or no bite, and the racing line can stay marbly all night - that's when a courser finish may be an advantage. I plateau finish everything as I don't want those course sipes to tear or feather back if the track gets good all of the sudden.

General rule for tires that leave our shop:
120 - 180 - 220g Burris for no bite tracks
220 - 400g for Maxxis.
View attachment 9048

-----
🏁Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
Carlson Motorsports on Facebook
31 years of service to the karting industry
Linden, IN
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
Are you picking burris for those conditions by choice or because that's the required tire?
 

OVALTECH1

Premium User
On my own tires I prefer to hit them with 80 first to create sipes and water channels to channel the water away just by that slim chance that maybe just maybe I remembered to bring enough quarters to start the water truck up 😂😂😂
5C81AB0A-101D-42B4-B015-69294DB20954.jpeg
 

CarlsonMotorsports

Premium User
Are you picking burris for those conditions by choice or because that's the required tire?
Generally, Burris is chosen as a spec tire rather than an open tire choice.
Rarely is Burris the "fastest" tire, but there are certainly tracks where they are very competitive. The biggest factor with Burris is choosing the right profile for cutting the tire and then getting the right prep in it for the track conditions. That leaves a LOT of variables to choose from when you start with a .110" thick tire to begin with.
On one hand, it's nice to be able to shape that thick rubber to customize it to your needs.
On the other hand, if it were thin rubber (like Maxxis, etc) you're not going to cut and bring several sets cut to differing profiles and tread depths to the track each week.
 
Yes it is. Due to low bite and wet track tires always seem to get slick and sealed over. We are running rookie class. Where do you guys get sandpaper from.
 

mike97760

Premium User
I had been grinding Burris with 80 grit for red clay tracks, I was happy with that. Went to a dry dusty track and changed to Vegas , ground them like the Burris, coarse. In two laps the tires were junk. Yes I was confused. Went to a different dry track, fine dust and sand here and there, used Vegas again ground 80 grit, Junk again. Contact surface was brown, not black. A tire knowledgable friend suggested I'd ground them too coarse, the fine track particles were packing into the pores. Switched to grinding with 150 grit, went back with same tires and was much better.
 
I had been grinding Burris with 80 grit for red clay tracks, I was happy with that. Went to a dry dusty track and changed to Vegas , ground them like the Burris, coarse. In two laps the tires were junk. Yes I was confused. Went to a different dry track, fine dust and sand here and there, used Vegas again ground 80 grit, Junk again. Contact surface was brown, not black. A tire knowledgable friend suggested I'd ground them too coarse, the fine track particles were packing into the pores. Switched to grinding with 150 grit, went back with same tires and was much better.
If your happy with 80 grit on red clay Burris switch to 240 you'll be happier, IF I paid someone to re-finish my tires and they gave them back with a course finish it would be the last time that would happen !!
 

CarlsonMotorsports

Premium User
I had been grinding Burris with 80 grit for red clay tracks, I was happy with that. Went to a dry dusty track and changed to Vegas , ground them like the Burris, coarse. In two laps the tires were junk. Yes I was confused. Went to a different dry track, fine dust and sand here and there, used Vegas again ground 80 grit, Junk again. Contact surface was brown, not black. A tire knowledgable friend suggested I'd ground them too coarse, the fine track particles were packing into the pores. Switched to grinding with 150 grit, went back with same tires and was much better.

This is exactly why we plateau finish our tires. (see post #5)
If you leave a tire (any tire brand) with a course finish, it will tear the rubber back if you have deep/course sipes. The finish of your tire is critical to wear. Too course, and the rubber tears back. Too fine, and the worst that can happen is that it not build heat as quickly on the low/no bite tracks. Plateau finishing gets the best of both scenarios. It consists of much more than simply using multiple grits. Think of it akin to plateau finishing an engine cylinder.
 

OVALTECH1

Premium User
I can attest to what Brian is saying first hand. Our track is normally dry dusty slick on that rare occasion that it was so dusty that we had to water in between classes the deep sipes I normally run were full of wet silt... clay. It was even hard to scrub out after coming off. There’s a tire for every track and every occasion I just happened to be on the wrong set.
 
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