struggling

More times then not for this condition the Recipe is NO prep you must be on the right compound of course, especially if track is hard and track has any abrasive material as part of it's make-up, if it does require prep best dry dusty slick Recipe I've came across id 50/50 Topaz & Blacksand.

interesting pov, there are several that race at this track that by the looks of their karts, do no maintenance or cleaning of their karts from week to week let alone any tire work, that seem to get around the track pretty nicely.....the track is hard and has some sand (silica) mixed in with the typical Midwest red clay and Missouri river bottom silt....
 
what also has become something of a serious source of frustration...been reading up/researching on many different preps, nobody seems to have a definitive "recipe" for no bite/no grip dust bowl track conditions....unless I missed something somewhere? anyone?


Wow, and I thought I pushed our products too heavily on here. :)

Our Black Bite 2.0 works great in these conditions (doesn't need much cure time, and won't kill the tires.)
BB2 adds bite - the more you wipe, the more bite you get.
We race a low/no bite track in Illinois and I typically wipe a base of 8 coats into our tires, then work them each week prior to race day (refinish/sand) and wipe with 2 or 3 coats on Monday and Tuesday of the week preceding our next race.
If you're on Maxxis, then I'd have them rolled internally with something like our Pink Panther. (2 ounces in the right sides and 1 ounce in the lefts.) The Panther will bring the duro down 3-5 points max. If you want to bring them down further, drop them from the outside with our Monster Bite (each light wipe will drop them 2-3 points.)
On dry dusty (no bite) tracks, I'm heavily prepping rather than less prepping as Ken suggested though.
Not softening -- softening and adding bite are two different aspects of the tire.

Krug, goat, creo, etc all add a ton of bite as well. If you're happy using those products, then stick with them.
As Ken said, Trac Tac offers products that will work also.


If I can help you any more with our product line specifically, please feel free to call our shop or PM me on here.




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Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
28 years of service to the karting industry
Linden, IN
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 
brian, I said many different preps, not EVERY prep ever made....: ) that, I fear, would take more time than I have left on earth to accomplish..... : )
 
Track TAC has a prep specifically for those Midwest no bite dry tracks, its called Rough Cut Diamond. You can wipe it during the week to build as much bite as you need then at the track wipe however many coats you need before going out. You can add a capful of creo if you need even more bite. The Diamond is my go-to prep for those real dry and dusty tracks and it works well. If I can hook up a 35hp Open with it on those conditions, you guys should be able to hook up stocks lol. I use low air and lower left % on those conditions as well, to get the tires into the track more
 
Track TAC has a prep specifically for those Midwest no bite dry tracks, its called Rough Cut Diamond. You can wipe it during the week to build as much bite as you need then at the track wipe however many coats you need before going out. You can add a capful of creo if you need even more bite. The Diamond is my go-to prep for those real dry and dusty tracks and it works well. If I can hook up a 35hp Open with it on those conditions, you guys should be able to hook up stocks lol. I use low air and lower left % on those conditions as well, to get the tires into the track more
THANKS! btw....i'm actually running a ltd mod animal :)
 
I like the diamond because it doesn't soft much at all if any. Ill usually wipe 3-4 coats Monday thru Wednesday and wipe light coats before going to the grid, giving them enough time to dry so when you set the kart down the tires aren't wet. I also prefer to be on an older, harder tire for those conditions as well, from my experience the track being hard and abrasive will eat newer tires up, especially Burris 33's
 
I like the diamond because it doesn't soft much at all if any. Ill usually wipe 3-4 coats Monday thru Wednesday and wipe light coats before going to the grid, giving them enough time to dry so when you set the kart down the tires aren't wet. I also prefer to be on an older, harder tire for those conditions as well, from my experience the track being hard and abrasive will eat newer tires up, especially Burris 33's

I ran across a couple sets of low lap non bar code maxxis, and bought some diamond, black sand, goat and acrysol---gonna mix up some stuff and give that a try this coming sunday, not going to mention what I tried this past sunday, it didn't work worth a crap....
 
I ran across a couple sets of low lap non bar code maxxis, and bought some diamond, black sand, goat and acrysol---gonna mix up some stuff and give that a try this coming sunday, not going to mention what I tried this past sunday, it didn't work worth a crap....

Get a quart of venom red, put several coats on during the week, then with the venom black at the track
 
Wow, and I thought I pushed our products too heavily on here. :)

Our Black Bite 2.0 works great in these conditions (doesn't need much cure time, and won't kill the tires.)
BB2 adds bite - the more you wipe, the more bite you get.
We race a low/no bite track in Illinois and I typically wipe a base of 8 coats into our tires, then work them each week prior to race day (refinish/sand) and wipe with 2 or 3 coats on Monday and Tuesday of the week preceding our next race.
I tried this for my Burris tires at Jennings in Indiana last week. Was my first time there. I wiped M,T,W then another wipe before each time I went out. It seemed like they were much better in the feature than in practice or the heats. Another driver told me I'd better off with a new tire and no prep until the track got some bite in it. Then another driver told me that I needed Krug Green.

This is confusing for a newbie. BB2, No prep or Krug green?
It seems like these are completely different approaches to attempting the same thing.
 
I tried this for my Burris tires at Jennings in Indiana last week. Was my first time there. I wiped M,T,W then another wipe before each time I went out. It seemed like they were much better in the feature than in practice or the heats. Another driver told me I'd better off with a new tire and no prep until the track got some bite in it. Then another driver told me that I needed Krug Green.

This is confusing for a newbie. BB2, No prep or Krug green?
It seems like these are completely different approaches to attempting the same thing.
They are two completely different approaches.
Green is very harsh vs a fresh unprepped tire.
Just goes to show you that opinions vary (right and wrong.) It is possible that both recommendations came from folks who won -- but I can guarantee you that only one of those answers would have worked with your tires.
Always stick with your tire/prep guy first before you venture off into the weeds and try someone else's suggestion.

BB2 early in the week - more coats = more bite. (Do NOT use in in conjunction with Green.)
Every time you come off the track, wash, dry, wipe a coat of BB2.0 immediately. If you need less bite, don't prep them this round. If you need more bite, use 2 coats allowing time to completely dry between coats. (or step to a different set if the track calls for something different.)
Use Monster Bite as your PRW. Jennings will be dry, so make sure the PRW is dry before hitting the track.

If the track gets "good" and builds bite, then back off the BB2.0 for sure or you'll be locked down.
 
Ok I am an asphalt guy so maybe no one will want to listen. I have never understood why there is nearly total obsession with tires and prep. Nobody even asked what your numbers are or what kart you are on. When we go to a track that for whatever reason is slick we always move weight right and it works. I also understand that the slickest asphalt track will probably have more grip then 90% of all dirt tracks. If prep just isn't working, try something else.
 
Ok I am an asphalt guy so maybe no one will want to listen. I have never understood why there is nearly total obsession with tires and prep. Nobody even asked what your numbers are or what kart you are on. When we go to a track that for whatever reason is slick we always move weight right and it works. I also understand that the slickest asphalt track will probably have more grip then 90% of all dirt tracks. If prep just isn't working, try something else.
Because on dirt, you have to have available grip matched between tires and track, maybe not perfect but a majority of it. Then you can go to moving weights, setup tuning, tire pressures to chase the minor issues and roll speed.
 
Because on dirt, you have to have available grip matched between tires and track, maybe not perfect but a majority of it. Then you can go to moving weights, setup tuning, tire pressures to chase the minor issues and roll speed.
I understand most of that but in post #5 Mr. Spin says that others on the same tires (How do you know?) run fine. If that is true, it seems to indicate that the problem may be else ware. Perhaps trying less left, more caster, or even a higher VCG will get the tires working with the chassis. If I am starting to sound like Al Nunley RIP ( I liked his posts) feel free to tell me to shut up.
 
I understand most of that but in post #5 Mr. Spin says that others on the same tires (How do you know?) run fine. If that is true, it seems to indicate that the problem may be else ware. Perhaps trying less left, more caster, or even a higher VCG will get the tires working with the chassis. If I am starting to sound like Al Nunley RIP ( I liked his posts) feel free to tell me to shut up.

I wish the OP could post a video if the track on race night. The thing with prepped tires is you can have 15 sets of maxxis, prepped 15 different ways and essentially you have 15 different "types" of tires. So just because everyone has the same letters on the side means little to nothing.

I'm pretty sure the answer has been posted already. A fresh set of untouched rubber if my picture in my head of the track is correct.

I hardly change setups UNLESS ive found that I dont have the "right tire" in the trailer so I get the "closest" tire then start fidgeting with setup to make that "close" tire work better
 
OP, if you are going to use a flap disc. Use 120 or higher number. If using 120, dont use a fresh disc. Hit some metal or something and wear it down some before using on tires
 
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