Things that make me wonder.

spincycle

Premium User
Personally, I don't spend any time preparing tires, at home or at the track, rather I've invested in some used equipment from the national weather service so I can keep a close eye on air density changes, I've also come up with a wiring system/onboard computer that connects to the needles on my carb that readjusts mixture up to 100 times per minute....does it increase my winning percentage? Not that I've noticed, but sure leaves many that look at my kart scratching their heads as they walk away....LOL! 🤣. (sorry Al, couldn't resist 😄)
 

Bob Evans

Grumpy Old Admin
Staff member
Personally, I don't spend any time preparing tires, at home or at the track, rather I've invested in some used equipment from the national weather service so I can keep a close eye on air density changes, I've also come up with a wiring system/onboard computer that connects to the needles on my carb that readjusts mixture up to 100 times per minute....does it increase my winning percentage? Not that I've noticed, but sure leaves many that look at my kart scratching their heads as they walk away....LOL! 🤣. (sorry Al, couldn't resist 😄)
Reductio ad absurdum. :)

How do you adjust for air density with the LO206?
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
I'm guessing of course, but it appears there are some that don't really know how this air density thing works. First off, air density does not use humidity as a component of the calculation. The Air density calculation assumes dry air. It uses temperature and barometric pressure to calculate air density. Because I'm retired and have nothing else to do, I kept track of the barometric pressure, temperature and humidity for two and half years. I have charts covering all those months here in Austin Texas. I have the formula for calculating air density which is also included in the charts. I also included it in my HP graph programs. I included relative humidity in the charts just as a reference.

Maybe you think I'm crazy, but it's interesting to me. It's helped to resolve a lot of mysteries that have confronted me. You would be surprised, I know I was, at the resistance have experience to this information.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Reductio ad absurdum. :)

How do you adjust for air density with the LO206?
Adjust the float level! There is some room in the jet sizing! Not being familiar with adjusting the float, how much easier would it be to just change the jet? And tell me, if air density is not important, and changing jets is not important, why are they changing the float level? What criteria are they using for reasoning that the float level needs to change?
 

flattop1

Dawg 89
The Dyno sheets i have all came with air density listed as a parameter .
You can adjust accordingly . Though my gauge and the builders gauge may not match .
No jetting charts . A jeting chart though nice , seems like an effort in futility .
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
The Dyno sheets i have all came with air density listed as a parameter .
You can adjust accordingly . Though my gauge and the builders gauge may not match .
No jetting charts . A jeting chart though nice , seems like an effort in futility .
I don't understand "adjust accordingly", what does that mean? I always thought that was the number to which the listed horsepower was arrived at. I.e. dyno indicated HP x correction factor = corrected HP.

My jetting chart (I think you've seen it) only shows the increase in area between jets of different sizes. Where is the "futile effort" in that?
 

flattop1

Dawg 89
Futile for the builder , to generate a jetting chart for the end user .
Kinda like a dyno sheet neat but it lays in a pile of papers any way .
The engine either preforms or it doesn't .

Now the high end two stroke guys , like skusa or shifter karts might have a use for such a chart but they might also have a mechanic/tuner on hand . So no need for one then either .
Yes i have used your jetting sheet , improved my johnson 140 tremendously.
Went from whats wrong with this thing too runs like a top .
Someone (not me) had drilled the jets .
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Would it be fair to say that 2 strokes are more temperamental than 4 strokes?
"Temperamental", yes, 2 strokes are temperamental, more temperamental than 4 strokes? I have no experience with 4 strokes, other than dragracing, but from what I read here, the problems that people have, it seems like 4 strokes are more temperamental. The valvetrain alone, it appears to me, doubles the number of problems you can have. Maybe more. Of course 2 strokes turn, in most cases, twice the RPM, and that will introduce problems in reliability, although they are engineered to absorb those extra stresses.
Now if you include the clutch in this calculation (I believe the 2 cycle has more problems in that area) the difference gets smaller.
 
" How can people denigrate my posts without offering an explanation of where I went wrong? They just call me names and say I'm wrong!! I've been accused of being condescending, what's worse? "
Sorry, Mr. Al, but in the course of this thread you demonstrate why you receive negative feedback.
Such as "Amazing!! Even with hard evidence, you deny the advantages of tuning to the conditions!! Absolutely Amazing, what can I say??'
I'm reminded of the old saying "you can lead a horse to water,..................." or "hard to teach an old dog........................"
"tuning is tough" "
You could have politely proven your point, but you chose to condemn. The person you reacted to didn't attack you - but you started a fight.
Then later you say " I have no experience with 4 strokes, other than dragracing..." which undermines your credibility on a site that primarily caters to 4 cycle engines racing on oval tracks.
We've been down this same road with you several times over the years. Don't ask questions that you already know you won't like the answers to.
 

mater

Premium User
Al, you think like the late Jerry Solt. He was an engineer that had worked for GM. He liked numbers and hard facts. I like to talk with him and I like reading your post. I cant hang on the same level all the time because my strengths lie in different areas, but like knowing there are some that are there. I read way more than I post and do get help and informed on here. You all should keep sharing info and disregard the comments.
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Al, you think like the late Jerry Solt. He was an engineer that had worked for GM. He liked numbers and hard facts. I like to talk with him and I like reading your post. I cant hang on the same level all the time because my strengths lie in different areas, but like knowing there are some that are there. I read way more than I post and do get help and informed on here. You all should keep sharing info and disregard the comments.
Sometimes some of the comments bother me, but I get over it. Especially when I hear comments like yours, and of course we all like to hear from people who like us.

I learned many years ago that no matter the subject, there's going to be a bell curve of responses. It's always a bell curve. Some like what you say, some don't like what you say, and there's a whole range of opinions in between.

Thank you for the encouragement, it's much appreciated.
 

spincycle

Premium User
peronally, i like to read many of Al's posts, for the most part, most of it goes right on over my head, but if there are a few good tips here and there i can pick up...well, isnt that what these forums are for? sadly, people who cant resist taking pot shots and trying to incite arguments and disagreements is the dark side of it all.... ;)
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
peronally, i like to read many of Al's posts, for the most part, most of it goes right on over my head, but if there are a few good tips here and there i can pick up...well, isnt that what these forums are for? sadly, people who cant resist taking pot shots and trying to incite arguments and disagreements is the dark side of it all.... ;)
Thank you.
 
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