Thoughts on LO206 rebuild and tune?

CB8

New member
I bought a LO206 from someone who didn’t give much history of the engine so just to be on the safe side and the fact that I’ve ran it for almost a whole season, I need to find someone to rebuild and tune it. I know it has most likely previously been to Ghost Racing Engines due to the stickers, but are there any recommendations or ideas? Please and Thanks!!
 

Gab507

Member
Ghost should be your first stop. With the serial number (the first 4 digits are the year of manufacture) they could probably give you info on that engine.
 
I bought a LO206 from someone who didn’t give much history of the engine so just to be on the safe side and the fact that I’ve ran it for almost a whole season, I need to find someone to rebuild and tune it. I know it has most likely previously been to Ghost Racing Engines due to the stickers, but are there any recommendations or ideas? Please and Thanks!!
Derek would be fine to take it to for a rebuild.
We would be glad to help you as well.
If it's been ran for a whole season, it's due for a freshen-up.
Typically touch up the valves and seats, new valve springs, head gasket, valve cover gasket, inlet needle, spark plug, fuel line and fuel filter.
Dyno tuning is also available.


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🏁Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
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32 years of service to the karting industry ~ 1Cor 9:24
Linden, IN
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 

jjchat

Member
Typically touch up the valves and seats, new valve springs, head gasket, valve cover gasket, inlet needle, spark plug, fuel line and fuel filter.
Just curious as to why you replace valve springs every seasons. Not trying to start an argument or suggesting it is incorrect, just asking as to the reason why. Are you seeing a drop in spring rate over time? Fatigue leading to failure / breakage?
 

Freezeman

Site Supporter
206 spring pressure also sparks my curiosity. I have been collecting and measuring the stock springs for years. My collection is all measured at .800 ht. and ranges from 8lbs-20lbs from used to new. Briggs also warns about using stronger after market springs as they aren't needed and can cause damage. I still wonder what would be the ideal spring pressure would be for the exhaust and the intake of the LO206 cam profile with the 6100 rev limiter. I have noticed that new ones are not all the same. I lived through the era of exhaust lobes wearing off of new motors yet that seems to have been resolved. I still have thoughts of using some weaker springs during the break in of new short blocks though.
 
Just curious as to why you replace valve springs every seasons. Not trying to start an argument or suggesting it is incorrect, just asking as to the reason why. Are you seeing a drop in spring rate over time? Fatigue leading to failure / breakage?
We don't always replace them, but I'd say that 85-90% of our rebuilds get them new after a season of racing.
The biggest culprit to spring pressures dropping is not pulling the motor over to TDC compression stroke at the scales after it is shut down. This allows the springs to cool at the installed height rather than compressed at lift. It's also beneficial to the valve and seat seal to allow the engine to cool down with both valves closed.
Rust, thrown chains, unknown life cycle, are all reasons to replace springs as they are cheap insurance.
We've done some experimenting with softer springs and there could be some gains to it if the return on investment were great enough. One collapsed or broken spring would cost more than any potential gain in my opinion (and of most of our customers.) Having a matched pair of springs is nice, but still not that big of a deal. Long slide engines like softer springs as well.
All that said...L206 races aren't being won with "trick" springs, they're being won with chassis set up and driver experience.
 
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