toe on searph

flattop1

Dawg 89
yes toe rf out
 

rdann86

New member
Ive done toe both ways, noticed no difference but i toe out rs just because thats the recomended way to do it.
 

Ltg

New member
There is a reason for toeing the RF out rather than the LF. It does make a difference but, admittedly, the difference is small. An explanation has never been made public as to why it works and how we know that it does in attempt to maintain our competitive advantage.
Todd
www.dynamicsofspeed.com
 

Arc Angel 18

New member
wouldnt setting the rf toe out tighten the kart up? especially on a seraph which is supposed naturally have a wicked push to begin with?
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
wouldnt setting the rf toe out tighten the kart up? especially on a seraph which is supposed naturally have a wicked push to begin with?
Never having driven an LTO kart, I probably shouldn’t even try to contribute to this discussion, but I have nothing else to do, ……so.
In sprint kart racing we use to set our front end with 1/16 total toe, (1/32 each wheel) but only to compensate for any tendency to toe out because of looseness in the front end. Karts of the day, circa 1970s tended not to be all that tight in the steering geometry. I had the feeling then, (and to be perfectly honest, I only did it because I was told about it and it seemed logical, I can’t say I ever noticed any difference.) and I have the same feeling now, that if it did anything at all, it might of helped “some” while going straight. Think about it; with Ackerman steering geometry, if you turn the wheel even the slightest amount, because both wheels are turning a different radius, that 1/32 toe would disappear. This means; the only place the toe could be doing anything is while going straight, and if anything, if there was no slack in the geometry, the toe would tend to work against you, creating drag in the front end. If it was doing anything in the turns, it wouldn’t be anything you could measure.
In an LTO kart, if you could measure it, I’ll bet you’d find that you would compensate for the drag on the RF wheel by turning just ever so slightly to the left to balance the drag between both front wheels. I’ll go so far as to guess that you couldn’t even measure how much you turn the steering wheel to compensate for that RF drag. And adding to that, there’s the extra steering effort you make turning the wheel to fight against the tendency for the kart to want to turn left because of the rear wheel stagger.
Now I know this is all speculation, but it would be interesting to see if someone could actually document, “with precision”, the difference in kart handling between having and not having RF toe out.
Comments, compliments, criticisms and questions always welcome.
 
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