Vega white and yellow

Treydye08

Member
Has anyone ever used the vega white on the left rear and the vega yellows on the right side ? My thinking is that i would be able to prep them all the same without having to worry about the left rear being to soft or have to much left rear grip. Thanks
 
If you're trying to unhook the kart (ie less LR drive) you can do that, but I think it's a band-ad fix.
Even with older karts, the problem may be too much lr drive, but there are other (better) ways to remedy this problem -- running a LR 5 points harder is just easier to do for most people.
I'd consider going down on cross, working on the RF camber, moving the LR out on the axle, getting some static (seat) weight off of the LR, etc before just bolting up a harder LR tire.

Personally, I like to keep the duro on my tires the same on all 4 corners. That way I can monitor wear patterns, (dare I say tire temperatures without causing someone to melt down), and air pressure gain to determine which corner of the car is working the most.

I'm not real particular on the LF if it's a couple points softer than the rest because you won't abuse it - since it is used primarily at corner entry.
Keeping them all pretty similar though gives you a better baseline to go off of. Throwing a different compound, brand, etc on one corner just confuses things for me. (Not to say I haven't done it in the past, but it wouldn't be my first choice.)

-----
🏁Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
Carlson Motorsports on Facebook
31 years of service to the karting industry
Linden, IN
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 

1fasttiller

Member
I learned this the hard way with our old 06 Prowler, we ran Vega yellows but the LR had to be wore out with cords showing or the kart would push. chased my tail on that for awhile. I never thought to try a harder tire on that corner, I would just make sure my LR was 8-10 points harder on duro and it seemed to work. Curious to see this coming season how our new ERC chassis works...
 

Pops90

Member
One thing to consider with mixing compounds is the spring rates of the tires. Significant differences (Running a Burris with a Vega, for example) will cause a change in handling.

I don't have any experience with the White Vega's, but I think they were made for quarter midgets if I'm not mistaken. I wonder if the sidewall has the same stiffness as the Yellow? The rubber will also act differently as the tire gains heat & pressure.
 

Kj26

Member
Has anyone ever used the vega white on the left rear and the vega yellows on the right side ? My thinking is that i would be able to prep them all the same without having to worry about the left rear being to soft or have to much left rear grip. Thanks

On asphalt yes, on dirt no.
 

Slack2014

Member
I went ahead and ordered a set of the cobras to try them out. Ive only raced about 6 times so im learning.

Check out the cobra website, great information on the way to get the tire ready. 1,000 ways and ideas, Going to their site will give you a baseline and something that is repeatable.
 

Slack2014

Member
I did the LR bit as well, On a straight up margay. Had a old DxC ( showing age here ) , Cords coming out of it if tight put it on and if loose had another with more rubber on it and ran it. Moved the LR in and out as needed, I see a lot of conversation that should set rear track and leave it.

We didn't chase and talk % and cross all the time. More less I would give feedback to dad and he would make changes not much with chassis. Did the same with our proforce, Dad used LBS to scale and we would do the off the track touch the tires with our hands and ideally get all 4 corners same or close meaning they are working evenly.

I ran NE north PA, we did not have speedway tracks and wide open tracks. Mixed tire brands and had the best luck leaving the DxC's left side and what the track called for compound duro on right. Applied prep that I made and went off with it. On a rare occasion we would run RM8s on all 4 corners when the track was hard black and glazing over for the feature.

Today the tire and prep and chassis is totally different. It was then and it worked, I think some of that can cross over to today. But the chassis alone have made big advancements.

I am still a big fan of repeatability of a product line , when it comes to these things and slow changes not wholesale changes.
 
If you're trying to unhook the kart (ie less LR drive) you can do that, but I think it's a band-ad fix.
Even with older karts, the problem may be too much lr drive, but there are other (better) ways to remedy this problem -- running a LR 5 points harder is just easier to do for most people.
I'd consider going down on cross, working on the RF camber, moving the LR out on the axle, getting some static (seat) weight off of the LR, etc before just bolting up a harder LR tire.

Personally, I like to keep the duro on my tires the same on all 4 corners. That way I can monitor wear patterns, (dare I say tire temperatures without causing someone to melt down), and air pressure gain to determine which corner of the car is working the most.

I'm not real particular on the LF if it's a couple points softer than the rest because you won't abuse it - since it is used primarily at corner entry.
Keeping them all pretty similar though gives you a better baseline to go off of. Throwing a different compound, brand, etc on one corner just confuses things for me. (Not to say I haven't done it in the past, but it wouldn't be my first choice.)

-----
🏁Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
Carlson Motorsports on Facebook
31 years of service to the karting industry
Linden, IN
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
You’re very considerate of ol Jamie .... 😂😂😂
 
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