Durometer readings

Looking for some opinions on how different durometer readings can match up on different track conditions.
Also, I see some tire preps have a softener in them, and some don't.
Just looking for some insight on when I would want to soften a tire,. (bring the durometer reading down).
 
soft track = soft tire
hard track = hard tire
(for the most part anyhow.)

If a track surface is abrasive, then you need a harder tire to handle the heat and wear that the tire will incur.
Soft & moist tracks that are less abrasive allow you to use a softer tire before wearing the tire excessively.

A recently cut up track, rain shower, or run-away water truck before you hit the track would be a good time to go with a softer tire - or any time that you are unable to build heat (or see some graining-wear) in a harder tire.

Be careful with durometer readings though (especially with thin rubber tires.) If the needle is able to touch the cords or webbing of the tire, it will give you a false reading. Also keep in mind that rubber will duro softer when it's warm than when cold. A tire checked @ 80*F ambient air temp. will most certainly duro softer than one checked @ 50*F.


-----
?Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
30 years of service to the karting industry
215 N. High St.
Linden, IN 47955
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 
soft track = soft tire
hard track = hard tire
(for the most part anyhow.)

If a track surface is abrasive, then you need a harder tire to handle the heat and wear that the tire will incur.
Soft & moist tracks that are less abrasive allow you to use a softer tire before wearing the tire excessively.

A recently cut up track, rain shower, or run-away water truck before you hit the track would be a good time to go with a softer tire - or any time that you are unable to build heat (or see some graining-wear) in a harder tire.

Be careful with durometer readings though (especially with thin rubber tires.) If the needle is able to touch the cords or webbing of the tire, it will give you a false reading. Also keep in mind that rubber will duro softer when it's warm than when cold. A tire checked @ 80*F ambient air temp. will most certainly duro softer than one checked @ 50*F.


-----
?Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
30 years of service to the karting industry
215 N. High St.
Linden, IN 47955
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
Thanks for valuable information!
 
soft track = soft tire
hard track = hard tire
(for the most part anyhow.)

If a track surface is abrasive, then you need a harder tire to handle the heat and wear that the tire will incur.
Soft & moist tracks that are less abrasive allow you to use a softer tire before wearing the tire excessively.

A recently cut up track, rain shower, or run-away water truck before you hit the track would be a good time to go with a softer tire - or any time that you are unable to build heat (or see some graining-wear) in a harder tire.

Be careful with durometer readings though (especially with thin rubber tires.) If the needle is able to touch the cords or webbing of the tire, it will give you a false reading. Also keep in mind that rubber will duro softer when it's warm than when cold. A tire checked @ 80*F ambient air temp. will most certainly duro softer than one checked @ 50*F.


-----
?Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
30 years of service to the karting industry
215 N. High St.
Linden, IN 47955
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
So keeping ambient temps in mind.... when you guys suggest a tire at a certain duro what temp are we talking about?
 
So keeping ambient temps in mind.... when you guys suggest a tire at a certain duro what temp are we talking about?
That really depends on how the air temperature affects the track. I've seen 100* days and a wet slopping track. Also seen 50* nights and a hard as a brick track, so don't just go by air temperature. Look at the wear that your tire is getting. To much wear = too soft. No wear = too hard. The tire should get a light graining to the surface to help dissipate heat - that's how they're made. Your tires also need to build some heat to work properly. If a tire is ice cold, it's not working. One that's too hot is working too hard on that corner.
Generally speaking, in the spring and fall when it's cooler and you have more ground moisture, you can go to softer tires, but that's not a hard and fast rule either like the examples I gave above.
 
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