LO 206 engine? Dirt tracks?

rsdz23

Member
Just curious why this isn’t a popular engine at dirt tracks. I look at a lot of the classes and they’re either clone, flathead, or predator. Can someone explain why please?
 

XXX#40

TRUMP 2020
Briggs shot themselves in the foot, and no on cares to run them, the 206 wasnt even a thought when the clones took over after the halt of the flathead
 

CarlsonMotorsports

Premium User
Just curious why this isn’t a popular engine at dirt tracks. I look at a lot of the classes and they’re either clone, flathead, or predator. Can someone explain why please?
Depends on where you are at.
There are decent 206 classes here in the midwest, but you won't find them much further south than I-70 on dirt.
I have my thoughts on why they're not as popular.
We support several series of 206s on ovals, and have customers winning from coast to coast.

As far as a specific reason "why" they're not as popular on ovals as they are on sprint road course tracks?
One is that you cannot buy a performance advantage. Yes, we (and others) tune the engines on the dyno and make small little legal tweaks here and there, but the engines are very similar from one to another. The rules on them are very tight and that's a big reason for the parity.
Without the ability to purchase more power in the engine department, that leaves chassis, tires, and driver to look at. Generally speaking, that'll be the same person doing all three jobs. There's no one left to blame if the kart doesn't perform. It's the nut behind the wheel that has to get the job done now, you can't blame the engine or builder. You can't blame the kart manufacturer, or sprocket manufacturer, or tire manufacturer, or tire prep manufacturer - it's all up to that one guy to make the right decisions on set-up and driving.

Start a class at your local track and it will grow. Everyone that runs these engines loves them, but sealed spec racing is not everyone's cup of tea.

-----
🏁Thanks and God bless,
Brian Carlson
Carlson Racing Engines
Vector Cutz
www.CarlsonMotorsports.com
Carlson Motorsports on Facebook
31 years of service to the karting industry
Linden, IN
765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 

rsdz23

Member
I agree with you Brian. From what I understand the 206 was Briggs way of trying to keep things fair, so it was about the driving not about who had the most cash to burn to get their kid a win. After a few yrs karting burned my Dad out & we left karting. He went on to build a small engine repair business though. Anyway I was just curious because it looks like an amazing engine & the asphalt guys seem to like it
 

Deadman#73

Member
They didnt blow a chance to help introduce the clone. Those chinese knock off hondas were in response to the outrageous prices the animals at the time. And now look the clone and animal are only a couple hundred apart from any major builder. Now that the clones have gotten oit of hand the predator is filling the shoes. Everyone wants the cheapest bang for their buck.

Comes down to longevity, power, and acceptability. Pick 2
 

CarlsonMotorsports

Premium User
I'm thinking that the introduction of the LO206 has become something paramount to political viewpoints...the facts have all too quickly been forgotten.
 
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CarlsonMotorsports

Premium User
Could it have been that the EPA made offering complete Raptor 4 engines not a possibility, and the Briggs corporate push was for a product that reflected their current engine line?

My belief is that the animal was not embraced from the beginning because racers had few/no other options. That, and the price-tag was a lateral move for racers at the time $1000-$1200 flathead vs $1000-$1200 blueprinted animal. Most thought "why should we make the change when we have so many good flatheads around," and refused to do so. Couple that with some holes in the road, so to speak, for the 1st 2-3 generations of animal engines, and a lot of racers were rightfully gun-shy. Then, due to the increasing price of flathead engines, folks were looking for a cheaper alternative. Along comes the $99 HF clone in Jamie's neck of the woods, and quickly things escalated pricewise - first $300, then $600, now, $1200+) The rules were all over the place from track to track across the country to the point where Briggs stepped up and produced a set of rules independent of the sanctioning bodies for their engine package, the LO206. From the beginning, it has been designed to be an affordable, reliable, level playing field, requiring no engine builder involvement such as blueprinting. Being that the rules were written by the manufacturer, tolerances have been kept in check (for the most part) from that very first set of rules, rather than changing rules as each manufacturers' tolerances vary as is the case with most sanctioning body's rule sets.
And that's where we're at now.

Like I said, spec engine class racing is not everyone's cup of tea.
As an engine "builder" I find it a bit boring, and not very profitable.
As a kart shop, I love the increase in consumable sales as more and more people can afford racing again.
With yearly LO206 rebuilds @ $135 (parts AND labor,) you will not find cheaper maintenance with any other engine currently being used in karting.
As a racer, it's sure a lot more fun to compete in a full class of karts that are on an equal playing field with no unfair advantage, and know that you are competing with your talent over your wallet.

Some take it, some leave it.
LO206 racing is not for everyone. It is for anyone.
 

jaymancds

Premium User
Could it have been that the EPA made offering complete Raptor 4 engines not a possibility, and the Briggs corporate push was for a product that reflected their current engine line?

My belief is that the animal was not embraced from the beginning because racers had few/no other options. That, and the price-tag was a lateral move for racers at the time $1000-$1200 flathead vs $1000-$1200 blueprinted animal. Most thought "why should we make the change when we have so many good flatheads around," and refused to do so. Couple that with some holes in the road, so to speak, for the 1st 2-3 generations of animal engines, and a lot of racers were rightfully gun-shy. Then, due to the increasing price of flathead engines, folks were looking for a cheaper alternative. Along comes the $99 HF clone in Jamie's neck of the woods, and quickly things escalated pricewise - first $300, then $600, now, $1200+) The rules were all over the place from track to track across the country to the point where Briggs stepped up and produced a set of rules independent of the sanctioning bodies for their engine package, the LO206. From the beginning, it has been designed to be an affordable, reliable, level playing field, requiring no engine builder involvement such as blueprinting. Being that the rules were written by the manufacturer, tolerances have been kept in check (for the most part) from that very first set of rules, rather than changing rules as each manufacturers' tolerances vary as is the case with most sanctioning body's rule sets.
And that's where we're at now.

Like I said, spec engine class racing is not everyone's cup of tea.
As an engine "builder" I find it a bit boring, and not very profitable.
As a kart shop, I love the increase in consumable sales as more and more people can afford racing again.
With yearly LO206 rebuilds @ $135 (parts AND labor,) you will not find cheaper maintenance with any other engine currently being used in karting.
As a racer, it's sure a lot more fun to compete in a full class of karts that are on an equal playing field with no unfair advantage, and know that you are competing with your talent over your wallet.

Some take it, some leave it.
LO206 racing is not for everyone. It is for anyone.
I race predator to our local rules. Notice I said local rules. We all know that everywhere you go has a different set of rules for what most consider a "spec" class. I got my predator ready to race for just under $300. Aside from weekly oil changes and 3 race plug swaps, its pretty low maintenance, I'm not planning a rebuild any time soon.

The idea that everybody in the country is running the same thing would be nice for sure.

How does the 206 compare to a predator? What about to a moderately modified predator?
 

Slick27

Member
Carteret County and Langley both run wing champs with the 206 motor on asphalt. Once track in western NC runs them on dirt.

A out the box predator vs a out the box 206? No doubt the 206 is a better motor.

Let's be honest predator is reviving the old stock appearing class of the flathead days.
 

XXX#40

TRUMP 2020
Could it have been that the EPA made offering complete Raptor 4 engines not a possibility, and the Briggs corporate push was for a product that reflected their current engine line?

My belief is that the animal was not embraced from the beginning because racers had few/no other options. That, and the price-tag was a lateral move for racers at the time $1000-$1200 flathead vs $1000-$1200 blueprinted animal. Most thought "why should we make the change when we have so many good flatheads around," and refused to do so. Couple that with some holes in the road, so to speak, for the 1st 2-3 generations of animal engines, and a lot of racers were rightfully gun-shy. Then, due to the increasing price of flathead engines, folks were looking for a cheaper alternative. Along comes the $99 HF clone in Jamie's neck of the woods, and quickly things escalated pricewise - first $300, then $600, now, $1200+) The rules were all over the place from track to track across the country to the point where Briggs stepped up and produced a set of rules independent of the sanctioning bodies for their engine package, the LO206. From the beginning, it has been designed to be an affordable, reliable, level playing field, requiring no engine builder involvement such as blueprinting. Being that the rules were written by the manufacturer, tolerances have been kept in check (for the most part) from that very first set of rules, rather than changing rules as each manufacturers' tolerances vary as is the case with most sanctioning body's rule sets.
And that's where we're at now.

Like I said, spec engine class racing is not everyone's cup of tea.
As an engine "builder" I find it a bit boring, and not very profitable.
As a kart shop, I love the increase in consumable sales as more and more people can afford racing again.
With yearly LO206 rebuilds @ $135 (parts AND labor,) you will not find cheaper maintenance with any other engine currently being used in karting.
As a racer, it's sure a lot more fun to compete in a full class of karts that are on an equal playing field with no unfair advantage, and know that you are competing with your talent over your wallet.

Some take it, some leave it.
LO206 racing is not for everyone. It is for anyone.
LOL you mean when we were buying pallets full of stock clones and hand picking stock parts ? no we wasnt, thats my story and im sticking to it
 
They didnt blow a chance to help introduce the clone. Those chinese knock off hondas were in response to the outrageous prices the animals at the time. And now look the clone and animal are only a couple hundred apart from any major builder. Now that the clones have gotten oit of hand the predator is filling the shoes. Everyone wants the cheapest bang for their buck.

Comes down to longevity, power, and acceptability. Pick 2
The LO 206 is by far the cheapest racing there is. IF you plan on racing more than 1 year. And it does put the winning advantage on Setup, tires, driver ability. Not on buying illegal parts to gain an advantage.
Predator class, if you don't cheat, you don't win.
 

rsdz23

Member
I race predator to our local rules. Notice I said local rules. We all know that everywhere you go has a different set of rules for what most consider a "spec" class. I got my predator ready to race for just under $300. Aside from weekly oil changes and 3 race plug swaps, its pretty low maintenance, I'm not planning a rebuild any time soon.

The idea that everybody in the country is running the same thing would be nice for sure.

How does the 206 compare to a predator? What about to a moderately modified predator?
I think that the route we are heading. A track around here is doing sealed predators & they’re have a great turnout & good racing too
 
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