Older go power dy-70 dyno questions?

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alvin l nunley

Premium User
The distance from the center of the axle to the center of the mounting point of the pressure transducer is the reason for the change in the horsepower formula. It's got to be close to 6 inches, center to center.

Go Power, when I built my dyno, was about 10 to 15 miles away from my shop.
 
I just have to go to in laws and pick up the base part. But wow that is a fine example of that I have been talking about. I'll be in touch when it comes ti.e to get this one in order. How often do you use it?
 

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original

Member
The distance from the center of the axle to the center of the mounting point of the pressure transducer is the reason for the change in the horsepower formula. It's got to be close to 6 inches, center to center.

Go Power, when I built my dyno, was about 10 to 15 miles away from my shop.
Al i believe arm was around six inches
 

alvin l nunley

Premium User
Got it thanks buddy. Looks like I got a lot to read on the toilet now. Lol
The information on the RPM/HP absorption ability should be carefully considered. My Go Power dyno came with a graph how fast the absorption unit had to be turning versus how much torque it could absorb. It's allowed me to connect the absorption wheel to the dyno with the gear ratio that would keep the absorption unit spinning at a minimum RPM. Yours is direct drive. But it's important to know how much torque the absorption unit can absorb without exceeding maximum RPM. That unit, I had one just like it, was used for shop courses and was, I think, designed to anticipate a stock Briggs & Stratton either 3 hp or 5 hp. Speculation, but you don't want to overpower the absorption unit. My dyno was quite a bit bigger in diameter and was rated as a 140 hp dyno. Maybe 120 hp. Look for that graph.
 
The information on the RPM/HP absorption ability should be carefully considered. My Go Power dyno came with a graph how fast the absorption unit had to be turning versus how much torque it could absorb. It's allowed me to connect the absorption wheel to the dyno with the gear ratio that would keep the absorption unit spinning at a minimum RPM. Yours is direct drive. But it's important to know how much torque the absorption unit can absorb without exceeding maximum RPM. That unit, I had one just like it, was used for shop courses and was, I think, designed to anticipate a stock Briggs & Stratton either 3 hp or 5 hp. Speculation, but you don't want to overpower the absorption unit. My dyno was quite a bit bigger in diameter and was rated as a 140 hp dyno. Maybe 120 hp. Look for that graph.It claims to be
It claims to be compatible upto 36 horse i think
 
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