timing mark on a 212cc

sCREamnClones

New member
Not exact but just what some of you guys line your timing up to

Sori, but I think you only have two(2) choices...#1, you simply install the f/w w/ the 'key' (stock or stepped) in place...or #2, you puchase a timing lite and a degree wheel and learn how too use it....accuriately. JMO
 

astrowrench

Member
Sori, but I think you only have two(2) choices...#1, you simply install the f/w w/ the 'key' (stock or stepped) in place...or #2, you puchase a timing lite and a degree wheel and learn how too use it....accuriately. JMO
Or#3 you can hold that big black wire and spin the flywheel and make a mental note of where the magnet is when it just passes the right hand coil leg,That should work I think
 

Kart43

Member
The coil fires the plug as the trailing edge of the magnet(the steel not the plastic housing) leaves the inside edge of the lower coil leg. This is very accurate in 99% of the engines.
 
I think Kart43 knows what he's talking about. I have checked stock flywheels that fired all over the place, but since I started using my timing light (and only use good flywheels) I haven't even really looked at where the coil was firing , as far as the magnet position.
 

jamiespop

New member
I'm pretty sure I saw on one of the karttrax videos, where Tom says the ARC flywheels fire in the middle of the magnet...anybody?
 

astrowrench

Member
I think Kart43 knows what he's talking about. I have checked stock flywheels that fired all over the place, but since I started using my timing light (and only use good flywheels) I haven't even really looked at where the coil was firing , as far as the magnet position.
Yes he's correct it fires as it leaves the right side coil leg with ARC flywheels; stock wheels are anybody guess
 
What kart43 is correct. His advice is usually spot on. You would do well to mind what youngengines says too. two of the good ones. The coil fires somewhere from the magnet being "centered' under to just leaving the lower leg. Magnet strength, coil itself, coil gap and rpm all play a role in exactly where. Get a light, spin the engine and shine the light on the coil to magnet interface. See where it fiires for that engine at that rpm. Most retard as the rpms go up. None of this will tell you what the timing is. it will tell you just at what point it fires. Now you can get a degree wheel, set it up and adjust it to what you want. OR you can get a #4 to #6 key, stick it in and "hope" its where you want it. Truthfully, thats what most do. Good luck
 

Kart43

Member
These coils have internal circuitry that causes a capactive discharge, it will happen each time the magnet passes a certain point on the coil. The timing differences some measure are due to tolerances that occur at the crank shaft and or flywheel keyway location. The timing retards as the electronics cannot keep up with the rate that the magnetic field interacts with the core of the coil as the RPM increases, It's not so much that the firing point changes, it is where the crank shaft ends up by the time the spark reaches the tip of the plug.
 

W5R

New member
These coils have internal circuitry that causes a capactive discharge, it will happen each time the magnet passes a certain point on the coil. The timing differences some measure are due to tolerances that occur at the crank shaft and or flywheel keyway location. The timing retards as the electronics cannot keep up with the rate that the magnetic field interacts with the core of the coil as the RPM increases, It's not so much that the firing point changes, it is where the crank shaft ends up by the time the spark reaches the tip of the plug.

Bingo! This is your answer. Anything this guy is willing to share, you would be wise to listen. I have been reading his posts since i joined this site and he has never steered anyone wrong or gave bad information.
 
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