Why calcium?

Ted Hamilton

Design Drafter / Racer
Forgive my ignorance, but why add calcium at all? Why go to the extra hassle and create a lot of rust issues too? What does the reduction in lap times get you, other than follow the leader racing with no margin for driving errors? I'd think an 11 sec. track with wide natural dirt / clay groove beats a rubbered up single groove dirtphalt track? And far less hassle.... what am I missing?
 
You missing a properly prepared calcium surface is NOT what you describe as it is NOT single groove follow the leader, your missing a properly prepared calcium surface is safer as it has more grip and a lot fewer cautions, As long as karts are NOT put out on track to early it creates NO additional rust issues.
Sounds like you never raced on a properly prepared calcium surface.
In the end ALL calcium does is continue to purge moisture while karts are running on it, which in the end creates more grip and also keeps track from going dusty, any day race that you ran that ended up single groove NO racing follow the leader would of been a total disaster without the use of it, one exception being using calcium and not having near enough moisture in and on the track when it goes on, plus not using enough then at some point it will go real dry dusty as the calcium gives a negative effect sucking the moisture out of the track and it actually dries out quicker than not using any. Any track that ends up single groove high speed parade has NOTHING to do with calcium being used, It's because the track does not take time to move the karts up and down the track all during practice.
 

Outrider

Member
Well, if we're taking sides, I'm with racing promotor. I'm fortunate enough to live in an area where sprint car racing is big, and have crew chiefed/crewed 600 micros and full sized 358 and 410 sprints on multiple tracks properly prepared using calcium. Done right, besides the traction advantages he cited (which make it easier to set the car up, as the track changes less during a race, taking a little of the guess work out of it, though no where near all of it), it's nice to have a track that only gets a little dusty, instead of turning into a dust bowl. That is especially important around here, as we start the season (brrrr) early (2nd weekly 410 race at Lincoln today), starting at 2pm instead of 7. Afternoon tracks are tough where dust control comes in, as most everyone on here has probably noticed. Proper use of calcium is a little spottier at the kart tracks in the area, but it is helpful, more often than not. My personal big issue is dust control - the rest is just a nice bonus. :)
 

Ted Hamilton

Design Drafter / Racer
re: dust control, why not have a quad with a mister spray bar take a couple laps between heats? Not putting real water down, but enough mist to pebble up the dust... Or better yet, make it a heavy, tacky track instead of dry rubbered up... I'd just as soon EVERYONE use treads for dirt racing.
 
Not enough ground clearance on karts to start and keep track real heavy even with treads. With Calcium as part of the prep process it get's done on the tracks time, watering between classes would get done on racers time everyone complains there at the track to long now, and on a 95* day in Aug that mist is gone with in minutes.
 

Outrider

Member
re: dust control, why not have a quad with a mister spray bar take a couple laps between heats? Not putting real water down, but enough mist to pebble up the dust... Or better yet, make it a heavy, tacky track instead of dry rubbered up... I'd just as soon EVERYONE use treads for dirt racing.
We've seen tracks try that; it doesn't work unless enough water is put down to require 10-15 minutes of re-rolling the track. It's done at intermission around here at early season afternoon races (like yesterday), when they have time to water a bit and adequately roll it in. Rather than helping anything, lightly watering without any rolling in just leaves you with a wet slick track for a few laps, rather than making it any heavier, in my experience. YMMV.
 

Ted Hamilton

Design Drafter / Racer
It would be interesting to invent a new kart-track tool like a sheepsfoot, only a bunch of 1" spikes that's spaced every 4" or so, and that would hold whatever water was put down. Kinda' like a supersized tire needler... It would need a bunch of independant rollers stacked so it didn't tear things up as it rolled along curves...

I've also wondered why they don't make a roller out of a bunch of hubs on a kart axle with concrete or water filled kart tires... independently spinning, towed by quad.
 

Jarrod

Member
It can be done with watering. It’s all about timing. A bit greasy after a re water, run it in until it’s close. It’s good to learn to drive when conditions are not like a slot car track. Much more fun as well. Slicks or treads it can be done. Calcium may serve a day race however it’s hard on the metals. Dirt is for the night time otherwise just run on pavement
 

btjones65

Member
re: dust control, why not have a quad with a mister spray bar take a couple laps between heats? Not putting real water down, but enough mist to pebble up the dust... Or better yet, make it a heavy, tacky track instead of dry rubbered up... I'd just as soon EVERYONE use treads for dirt racing.
Try Mountain Creek Speedway. Jon Setzer makes a great heavy, tacky track.
 
Top