pz carb DQ

foreverfaster

Premium User
i blew up an LO 206 some time ago.. let it set on my shelf for parts...
friend of mine needed a carb so i pulled it and gave it to him. he entered an event and got DQ'd he was told it was an animal carb.. APPARENTLY they are not the same. (206/animal) someone please explain?? I feel bad could have cost a ton of winnings, as it was it was a couple hundred bucks lost.. The interesting thing is he was not the only one, others got Dqd as well..

whats the difference, and how did i get one?.
 

flattop1

Dawg 89
18. Carburetor & Intake Manifold
The B&S stock carburetor part #555658 is the only carburetor permitted. ‘Walbro’,
‘Briggs’ diamond logo and/or #590890 etched in the body are additional visual
indicators. No alterations allowed unless stated below. All parts will be compared to a
stock known B&S part for eligibility. This includes the nozzle, emulsion tube, jets,
float, float needle and all other carb parts. It will be allowed however to adjust the
float height by means of bending the small tab on the float arm.
A slight chamfer around the choke bore ID
(air horn) may be present. 1.149" no go Tech Tool A7.
Both idle and main jet must remain stock, as shipped from the
factory.
This is copy and paste from briggs rule set .
Verify legality .
 

CarlsonMotorsports

Premium User
Let me guess, they were DQ'd on the venturi being too large?
If that's the case:
Some of the older carbs had a slightly larger venturi. This was addressed in the rules several years ago (nothing new here.)
There has been an emphasis lately on checking this area as some builders have been massaging/stretching this area of the carb in an attempt to gain power.

Now, if there was other work done to the carb, then that would be a reason for the dq as well. Stock means stock (well, almost.) ;)


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Carlson Racing Engines
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765-339-4407
bcarlson@CarlsonMotorsports.com
 

Kart43

Member
The explanation of it being an Animal carb is not enough, there has to be an explanation of what specifically did not meet the specific rules. I think a major mistake may have been made in tech, perhaps by an ill informed official.
 

JPMKarting

Premium User
The explanation of it being an Animal carb is not enough, there has to be an explanation of what specifically did not meet the specific rules. I think a major mistake may have been made in tech, perhaps by an ill informed official.
If the carburetor was not the above mentioned part number int he rule set, there isnt any need to go further then that.
 

Kart43

Member
And that is why I stated "there has to be an explanation of what specifically did not meet the specific rules " if the carb is not the correct part # or there is a specification that did not measure properly it should be clarified.
 

foreverfaster

Premium User
Brian and others, you are correct venturi failed the go-no go gauge. the tech was a "certified Briggs tech" I will see if he has the carb. clearly not that i know what i'm looking at! I want to look at it to see the numbers or other indicators. EVERY Briggs motor i have, started as a case sealed LO206.. none of the parts on any of my sealed motors have ever been rubbed on for any reason. I still have two great 206 motors, i wonder if they are legal??

How was it addressed to take care of the difference between new stock and old stock.. if old was a "little bigger" ???

Just so i'm straight on this.. looking for a yes or no. Birggs makes 2 carbs.. a bigger stock Animal carb and a stock LO 206 carb??
sorry if i sound a little irritated, it bothers me i gave a friend a part and it was not what it was suppose to be.
 

01ron

Member
I'm not a tech guy but from what I've been told, its the .602 venturi horizonal measurement that is close. If the tool is rocked up and down OR side to side, it can be forced to fail on the older carbs. The rules state it's a HORIZONAL check. Slide the tool in horizontally, and you either pass or fail. Once again, I'm not a tech man but this was what I was told by an engine builder.
 

CarlsonMotorsports

Premium User
If the no go gauge "enters" the slide bore (ie you can see the gauge from the top of the slide when checking) then it is deemed illegal.
There is only one part number for animal/LO206 carburetors.
There are some older Walbro carbs (not all of them) which the venturi no-go gauge will slip into and be visible from the top, ie too large of venturi.
The only way to know if your carb is legal is to check it with a no-go gauge (they are available from Sox or Stout) or you can have your local tech man check it for you.
 

Kart43

Member
As I said earlier the exact reason it is DQ'ed should be stated as there is one part # The earlier carbs could be tech wrong but with the proper guage, and technique a carb that has not been modified is almost certain to pass. There are of course the possibilities of an oddball or manufacturing flaw.
 

Jimbo

If you talk the talk you should walk the walk
It's my guess that the carb was perfectly legal when it was new.
Put it on an engine and heat it up and cool it down a hundred times, bounce the heck out of it a bzillion times on the track and put hundreds of pounds of pressure on the top of the carb by mashing the pedal to the metal and guess what happens to the carb measurements?
It's my belief that everyone should have that carb gauge in their tool box and measure their carb frequently to make sure it passes tech.
Call me
I have the gauge you need!
 
Now, take your certified Briggs .602 gauge and measure it with a high accuracy micrometer (the one I used is accurate to +- 0.00005). Compare that against someone else's Briggs .602 gauge and I bet you find a difference - we sure did. I had 3 gauges in tech, one showed my carb as a DQ, the other 2 did not - thats when I went and grabbed a micrometer and sure enough there was a diff (if I had a brain I would have written the numbers down but this was in tech and my driver was about to get DQ'd...lol) . Suffice to say, I have shelved that carb, which is not an early Walbro FYI... You'll find the same tech tool variance with the Briggs needle block too.
 

Jimbo

If you talk the talk you should walk the walk
I recently bought 20 -- .602" carb gauges and only one of them was exactly .602"
The others were either above or below .602"
I'm in the process of making my own gauges.
Stay tuned!
 
Now, take your certified Briggs .602 gauge and measure it with a high accuracy micrometer (the one I used is accurate to +- 0.00005). Compare that against someone else's Briggs .602 gauge and I bet you find a difference - we sure did. I had 3 gauges in tech, one showed my carb as a DQ, the other 2 did not - thats when I went and grabbed a micrometer and sure enough there was a diff (if I had a brain I would have written the numbers down but this was in tech and my driver was about to get DQ'd...lol) . Suffice to say, I have shelved that carb, which is not an early Walbro FYI... You'll find the same tech tool variance with the Briggs needle block too.
You really have a micrometer that reads in 5/100,000? You must be able to breath on it and change the reading.
 
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I recently bought 20 -- .602" carb gauges and only one of them was exactly .602"
The others were either above or below .602"
I'm in the process of making my own gauges.
Stay tuned!
The below ones should be of concern to Briggs. They either need to get the tech tool supplier(s) to tighten their tolerances or adjust the regulations by a few thou - although that would mean existing tech tools would be nfg.
 

foreverfaster

Premium User
as an up date, we bought a go/nogo gauge. checked the carb. Yes the carb has the briggs logo on the side of it. it measured correctly... mostly. if you didn't have the tool exactly lined up, it could be tipped or slipped right in.. we measured the gauge. we didn't trust our tools so we took it to a machine shop and they measured it.. over 601 but not quite 602.
 

Jimbo

If you talk the talk you should walk the walk
If you are testing your own carb in your own garage or trailer a .601" or smaller gauge will make sure your carb is legal but if you are doing it as a tech official you should verify that your gauge is spot on the measurement.
If your gauge is .601 or smaller and it doesn't go in then the .602" gauge for sure won't go in.
 
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