Your favorite Brand of Lubricant?

To day was a lucky day. I found a few cans of the ultimate lube imo. TRI-FLOW!!! I always pick it up when I see it cause it is quite hard to find around my area. Yes of course I could order it on line but I still ain't used to that yet. So my question is what kind do you all use? And more importantly what do you use it for?
 

mike97760

Site Supporter
I tend to use Tri Flow a lot but if there isn't a can handy I will use the first can I see in the shop or trailer. We disassemble, sonic clean and install bearings so much that our bearings are pretty clean usually.
 

jsf74

Member
Ive been wondering about this? Never seen anyone mention anything about it.
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mike97760

Site Supporter
Ive been wondering about this? Never seen anyone mention anything about it.View attachment 19813
I know nothing about X-Treme, in fact never heard of it. It might be wonderful stuff but my take on it is that its a heavy oil that needs to be heated to lower the viscosity to the point its thin enough to really get into every available opening in the bearing. What about when it cools? Is it again thick and offering more resistance than a thin spray oil? And I am thinking after its cool and sticky, is it a dirt magnet? Again I dont know but I am thinking I would prefer the lightweight sprays and repeating as needed not to mention cleaning of the bearings on a weekly basis and repeating as necessary.
 

ClarkSr

Member
We road race, so we don't have the same dirt concerns some of you folks have. For general lub, bearings, tie rod ends, linkage, etc., I like Tri-Flow. Xeramic Chain Lub for chains, it even works on shifters. We currently use it on both our Tags and 206's. PB Blaster for rust prevention on unpainted stuff that rusts, like bumpers and axles. Even seems to standup well over the winter in the trailer. And we clean stuff with WD40.
 

Pete_Muller

Moderator
Great question for a new topic!

I use a variety of oils and greases for different purposes, but if I had to list a "favorite", I'd say it's Anti-Seize. The silver stuff that comes in a small tube.

I actually keep a very small brush right next to the tube in a tray in my toolbox, and there is always a bit of anti-seize on the tip of that brush.

On kart engines, I will alway brush a bit on spark-plug threads, case screw threads, and barrel and/or head stud threads before assembly. It's actually very rare that I don't coat fastener threads without a little touch of it. On the kart itself, the axle will get a very light coating where it rides in the bearings, and I will usually apply a very faint "haze" of it where brake and sprocket hubs clamp to the axle. I most definitely always apply it to the threads of the pinch-bolts on the rear hubs.

Essentially, pretty much anything that I want to be able to take back apart easily gets a faint coating of anti-seize. It's my most useful (and probably most used) lubricant.

PM
 

"J'-remy

Member
mobil one high temp grease for clutch needle bearings. Zep45 for bearings, Dupont chain wax with teflon for the chain. spray down after washing with WD40 to get rid of the water.

Johnny Walker is blended. Lagavulin 16yr old or Bruichladdich 8yr old single Malts when your ready for the real stuff
 

rainman

Site Supporter
Great question for a new topic!

I use a variety of oils and greases for different purposes, but if I had to list a "favorite", I'd say it's Anti-Seize. The silver stuff that comes in a small tube.

I actually keep a very small brush right next to the tube in a tray in my toolbox, and there is always a bit of anti-seize on the tip of that brush.

On kart engines, I will alway brush a bit on spark-plug threads, case screw threads, and barrel and/or head stud threads before assembly. It's actually very rare that I don't coat fastener threads without a little touch of it. On the kart itself, the axle will get a very light coating where it rides in the bearings, and I will usually apply a very faint "haze" of it where brake and sprocket hubs clamp to the axle. I most definitely always apply it to the threads of the pinch-bolts on the rear hubs.

Essentially, pretty much anything that I want to be able to take back apart easily gets a faint coating of anti-seize. It's my most useful (and probably most used) lubricant.

PM
Smart thinking as usual here, Pete.
 
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